Business

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My conversation with our newest MIX Maverick Andrew McAfee yielded all kinds of bracing insight when it comes to how we set strategy, structure work, unleash talent, and measure success. But I haven’t been able to shake one idea in particular he threw out at the end of our conversation as a provocation.

First, we spent a lot of time on how the job of a leader changes in a world that is increasingly open, powered by social technologies, and morphing at warp speed. Andrew calls this world Enterprise 2.0. In this world, says Andrew, “If you want good things to happen, get out of the way. Let people interact and collaborate and communicate in the ways that are most natural to them. Then your job as the leader of the organization is to simply put in place the environment that lets them do that, encourage them to do that, and then harvest the good stuff that comes from all of their interactions.” » Read more

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Avoid the tool trap when building communities

Over the last few years, I've had the opportunity to work with many different organizations attempting to build successful communities inside and outside the open source world.

Many of them quickly fall into something I call the tool trap.

Meaning, they immediately jump into a conversation about what tool or technology they will use to support the community:

"Where are we going to put the wiki?"

"Should we build the website using Drupal?"

"What should we call the mailing list?"

"We should starting playing around with [new technology X]." » Read more

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Recap: Open Your World webcast with Henry Chesbrough and Gary Hamel

Gary Hamel, the webcast's moderator, is also the driver behind the session's co-sponsor, the MIX, which he described as "the world's first open innovation project aimed at reinventing management." He encouraged everyone to use the site to learn, contribute, and most of all to get involved in a pioneering initiative.

Hamel then introduced Henry Chesbrough, who has been a force in bringing the idea of open innovation to the forefront since his first book was published in 1995. » Read more

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Open Services Innovation webcast today

The opensource.com team and the Management Information eXchange (MIX) are hosting a webcast on Open Services Innovation with Henry Chesbrough and Gary Hamel today, November 11, at 1:30 p.m. EST.

Topics of discussion include: » Read more

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BetterMeans: a new app for running your organization the open source way

Last week I received a heads up about a new web application launching today from a company called BetterMeans with an impressive goal: to build the infrastructure (processes, technology, governance, etc.) to make an open organizational structure like we talk about here on opensouce.com a reality.

From their website:

BetterMeans.com is a web platform where people can start and run companies in a new decentralized way.

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Poll: Open innovation etymology

Even if you know when the term "open innovation" was coined, do you know who came up with it?

Professor Henry Chesbrough, Executive Director of the Center for Open Innovation at the University of California (Berkeley), first used the term in his book, Open Innovation – The New Imperative for Creating and Profiting from Technology. » Read more

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Comparing Apples to Androids: Why the future of smartphones looks open

In the few weeks I have owned a smartphone (a Kyocera Zio with Android), I've been fascinated to see how many non-technical users are experiencing the power of open source for the first time.

Between the proliferation of free and inexpensive apps in the Android Market and the numerous mobile companies offering their own Android phones, it's hard to believe it all started with a single G1 phone.

(Yes, I remember the Trolltech Greenphone and other predecessors, but nevertheless, a tip of the hat to Google for getting Android onto 19%—perhaps 20% before I finish typing this parenthetical disclaimer—of all smartphones.) » Read more

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Open innovation and open source innovation: what do they share and where do they differ?

Recently, Stefan Lindegaard, open innovation expert and author of the new book The Open Innovation Revolution, joined opensource.com for a webcast about open innovation. » Read more

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Open Services Innovation: An Open Your World Forum webcast with Henry Chesbrough and Gary Hamel

Register now to join us Thursday, Nov. 11 at 1:30 p.m. EST/ 10:30 a.m. PST for an Open Your World Forum webcast with Henry Chesbrough and Gary Hamel.

Open means different things to different people. To some, open source and open innovation mean free access and a requirement to return enhancements back to a broader community. But businesses ask: where's the competitive advantage? How can the two paradigms co-exist, for mutual benefit? » Read more

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You're making decisions by consensus, but are you collaborating?

Recently I came across an article by Roy Luebke at Blogging Innovation that asked the rather interesting question, “Is Management by Consensus Killing Innovation?” While I've (thankfully!) never had a manager whose decision-making was contingent upon the agreement of a team, I have spoken with many people who confuse the concept of collaboration with consensus.

Collaboration does not require consensus. Collaboration means working together toward solutions, pooling talents and ideas, and recognizing both successes as a team and the specific contributions of members. Consensus is a team's unanimous agreement on a decision. I am prepared to argue that when consensus is consistently and quickly reached, collaboration may not be happening at all. » Read more

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