Business

Management ideology: The last bastion of American hegemony

Management ideology: The last bastion of American hegemony

Here is a tricky question: How many living management gurus can you name who did not learn their trade in North America? I have asked many colleagues this question, and it's pretty hard to come up with a good list. For example, consider the individuals in last year's "Thinkers 50" ranking list. By my reckoning, there are only seven who make the cut: Richard Branson (Virgin), Kris Gopalakrishnan (Infosys), Kjell Nordstrom and Jonas Ridderstrale (Stockholm School of Economics), Lynda Gratton, Rob Goffee and Gareth Jones (London Business School).

Does this matter? I think it does. » Read more

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Is your organization fit for heretics?

Is your organization fit for heretics?

"Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM."

That chestnut has morphed from sales proposition to object lesson on the perils of clinging to convention in less than a generation. We've ditched the dark suits and "sincere" ties of our father's IBM for black turtlenecks and jeans, and we've embraced the "think different" ethos of Apple's celebrated campaign:

"Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in square holes. The ones who see things differently."

But how much has really changed? » Read more

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Open*Business: 2011 in review

Open*Business: 2011 in review

The principles of open source continue to have a huge influence on the science of management. Collaboration, transparency, community, and rapid prototyping are used frequently to describe  management innovations that are taking place in companies around the world.

We published a great collection open source business stories during 2011--here are a few of my favorites: » Read more

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Open*Business 2011 best images

Open*Business 2011 best images

The visual components on opensource.com are an important element to the look and feel of our content. The images help set the tone for the site. The imagery embodies qualities such as motivational, editorial, authoritative (but not authoritarian), human, and optimism.

Without our imagery, the content on the site would be plain and unsightly. We'd like to highlight some of the images from 2011 and give you a chance to pick your favorite. » Read more

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Get the right people on the team (and the wrong ones off)

Get the right people on the team (and the wrong ones off)

No one would dispute that teams are critical to an organization’s success. Yet many teams feel they're not performing as well as they should be. Poor team performance, especially among teams that work across departments or functions, tend to breed silos, competing agendas, turf wars, and indecision; high performance produces organizational coherence and focus. » Read more

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Levelling the playing field for procurement of open source solutions

Levelling the playing field for procurement of open source solutions

The software market has changed. Government entities and the corporate market are now embracing open source software like never before, primarily for its twin attributes of cost-effectiveness and flexibility. IT departments are more educated on the risks and benefits, and now routinely use open source applications within large, mission-critical systems. In parallel, an innovative marketplace has emerged, delivering a range of services such as implementation, maintenance and customisation of open source software. Forward thinking governments have developed policy positions to encourage departments to harness the benefits of an increasing pool of mature enterprise-level open source software. » Read more

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Three myths about innovation

Three myths about innovation

Innovation, simply defined, is the process that takes new ideas and implements them in a way that creates value. It's not the same thing as invention, which is an event that occurs at a distinct point in time, often resulting in a single product. Innovation is the extension of invention, the act of bringing things that are invented to market, repeatedly.

An innovation process creates measurable value, by increasing productivity, improving quality, generating new markets, or creating other benefits to consumers, producers, or both.

 As Dell Services' chief innovation officer, I spend a lot of time talking with people about innovation and I'm often amazed how many misconceptions there are about it. Here are three popular myths about innovation, along with some comments about how we at Dell are addressing the issues they raise.

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The well-field system: Open source 30 centuries ago

The well-field system: Open source 30 centuries ago

Where does open source come from? » Read more

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New report: Communities of passion

New report: Communities of passion

There are innovative organizations that most of us find inspiring because on the inside, they're essentially passionate communities. But what do companies like Google, Red Hat, IDEO, Apple, 3M, and W.L. Gore have in common? And what defines a community of passion, anyway?

Over the past few months, I've been engaged in a Management Hackathon with a few folks you might recognize from opensource.com and some other members of the Management Innovation eXchange (MIX), an online community started by Gary Hamel. » Read more

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