Business

Red Hat, opensource.com, and the high road

In my role as Red Hat’s brand manager, I am always on the look out for interesting and provocative readings about brands and branding in general. Inside the technology industry, outside the technology industry – it’s all good. There’s something to be learned from every great case study, thought piece, theory, and brand story. » Read more

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How do you sell a community-based brand strategy to your executive team?

One of my favorite regular blog subjects is how to use community-based strategies to build brands. In fact, I'm putting the finishing touches on a new book entitled The Ad-Free Brand: Secrets to Successful Brand Positioning in a Digital World which will be out this August and covers exactly that topic.

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Seven counterintuitive truths for managers

How do you get customers to send bouquets to staff for great service (literally) yet cut costs at the same time? By discarding (almost) everything you think you know about management and doing the opposite.

Here are seven counterintuitive business truths, distilled from nine uplifting (how often can you use that term in connection with a management event?) success stories recounted at a Vanguard Leaders Summit last month—included among them, the MIX's M-Prize winner Owen Buckwell. » Read more

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The many markets of open source

Even people inside the open source market tend to underestimate it.

They think of it the way they think of the software market. If you're not collecting cash tribute for support (the equivalent of a cash price for the code) you somehow don't count. » Read more

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Open source is more than throwing code

Open source has achieved a bit of popularity in the tech world, and has even become a bit mainstream. I sadly think this means that many have and will continue to miss the point of what being open source really means. Open source doesn't just mean showing source code. Many people think that such code drops are the only thing necessary for open source buzz to take over. » Read more

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Open source, giving freely, and self-awareness

In a July 2010 post on opensource.com, Jonathan Opp wrote about the nature of giving and participating in a gift culture/economy. One point that he mentions is the benefit of giving freely, without strings attached. I’d like to expand on that, since I think there’s a lot we can learn from recognizing the hidden strings that we sometimes attach to our gifts. » Read more

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Who will be the new face of openness at Google?

Last week, Google Senior Vice President of Product Management Jonathan Rosenberg resigned after almost 10 years at the firm. While the comings and goings of tech industry executives aren’t typically that interesting to me, I found this news fascinating for a couple of reasons. » Read more

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Darwinism determining the future of cloud computing?

We are barely into the beginning of cloud computing, so any prediction of what its future will be prone to error. Massive shifts in IT, such as the shift away from client/server into cloud architectures, are a function not only of winning technologies but also of users' behavioral patterns and of leading vendors' strategic decisions. That's one reason why prediction is so difficult. » Read more

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Some authenticity advice from the Avett Brothers

I’m passionate about helping organizations develop more authentic, meaningful, and productive relationships with the communities around them. Last week, I suggested a few ideas for how to begin thinking about a less self-centered approach to community strategy that might help. » Read more

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Belated thoughts on the “Building a Better Boss” webcast with Bob Sutton

Just last week, I realized I still hadn’t made time to listen to the webcast some fellow opensource.com contributors hosted with Bob Sutton last October. I’ve been an avid reader of Bob’s blog, Work Matters, and it’s hard not to like a guy who writes a book called “The No-Asshole Rule.”

Missing the webcast was most definitely a regrettable oversight, but one quickly remedied today. » Read more

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