Education

Paolo Mangiafico, on Open Access at Duke University

We spoke recently with Paolo Mangiafico, the Director of Digital Information Strategy in the Office of the Provost at Duke University, about Duke's open access initiatives.

Recently, Duke announced that it would join MIT, Harvard and Stanford in adopting an open access policy, in which the scholarly articles written by faculty members are made freely available to the public for non-commercial use, by default. What was the rationale for Duke's decision? » Read more

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Moodle Milestone: 2.0 Beta Preview

Those who've been waiting for the release of Moodle 2.0 are getting their open source just rewards this week.  The release, which has been met already with several delays, is a "beta preview" -- which is to say, not yet a stable release, but a functional template of what's in store for early adopters (note that Moodle HQ will be releasing weekly updates as the code matures as a series of beta previews leading up to the stable release¹).   » Read more

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Introducing Open Source to A Middle School

There are so many compelling reasons for children to use open source. If they develop skills and a body of work using open source software, it can follow them through high school, college, and even into the professional world. It won't cost them or their school any license fees. Using the open formats promoted by free & open source software, their writings and projects will stay accessible, avoiding bitrot. » Read more

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The Secret Lives of Faculty: Getting There

The path to becoming a college professor is (at best) non-lucrative, typically a substantial debt burden, and at worst a dead-end. Once one "arrives," it is another six years until you are officially a wiseguy of the academy, and if the pyramid scheme doesn't pay out, you're done. Join me in a look at the path faculty must take so they can work with you to promise open source software in higher ed. This is article 1 in the series (previous articles: 0).

» Read more

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Open Source: Modernizing India's education system

Over the last few years, open source adoption has been growing within India's education system. Five years ago, the South Indian state of Kerala, pioneered open source in schools with its famous IT@Schools project, that now covers three million students from the 5th-10 standards, involves 200,000 teachers across 4071 schools. Since then, other Indian states like Karnataka, Gujarat, Assam, West Bengal and others have made open source a key part of their school education initiatives. » Read more

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Can you Moodle me now?

In its 10 year history, Moodle has been confined to computer screens around the world; with countless fields, description areas and scrolling filling the screen.  There have been attempts at mobilizing Moodle in the past, but as a user you either didn't have the time to use it or it simply wasn't worth using.  With the proliferation and widespread availability of web-capable phones, however, mobile customers worldwide now have in hand a versatile portal into the web and to Moodle. » Read more

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Allegheny first-years dive into Fedora

This semester, a colleague and I have been running a parallel set of freshman seminar courses. Darren Miller (a photography professor in the Art Department) is teaching a course titled Art and Activism, and mine is titled Technology and Activism. These topical courses are part of an Allegheny student's introduction to writing and presentation skills—and we decided to take that to another level this semester. » Read more

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Can Professors Teach Open Source?

At teachingopensource.org, we think so, and we wrote a book to help.  The following excerpt comes from the Foreword of our new textbook, Practical Open Source Software Exploration, which is licensed under Creative Commons BY-SA-3.0.  It's a book that works like an open source software project.  In other words: patches welcome.
» Read more

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The Secret Lives of Faculty: Background

I submitted a proposal for a talk to OSCON titled "The Secret Lives of Faculty." The Twitterable blurb went like this:

This presentation will introduce open source practitioners to the secret lives of computing faculty in higher education. We will introduce the kinds of students we teach, the curricula we teach to, and the metrics by which we are evaluated.

This post will be the first in a series that explores this topic. The goal is to provide a starting point for dialog and debate about how to best encourage and support faculty in higher education as they consider how best to leverage open source in their classrooms.

» Read more

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CSH Seminar Series: Karlie Robinson

Karlie Robinson, a Rochester local and open source entrepreneur, gave a short talk at RIT about open source and business as a part of the Computer Science House (CSH) Seminar Series.  This year, CSH has hosted speakers such as Kevin Purdy, contributing editor of Lifehacker, and Charles Profitt, of the Rochester Linux User Group (LUGOR), which meets regularly at Rochester » Read more

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