Government

Rebuilding Ecuador's economy with open source principles

a new dawn with open source

Here’s a development that could have enormous global implications for the search for a new commons-based economic paradigm. Working with an academic partner, the Government of Ecuador has launched a major strategic research project to "fundamentally re-imagine Ecuador" based on the principles of open networks, peer production, and commoning.

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Hacking government procurement with a new RFP

duplication

If you’re familiar with any type of government procurement process, it usually involves an RFP—a request for proposal. But today, with declining revenues and limited resources, the approach to partnerships and getting work done may change within government in the near future. I forsee a shift from the traditional RFP process to a request for partnership. » Read more

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10 tools to help open source cities maintain transparency

tranparency for open government

Today, transparency is a critical aspect in all areas of government. With Internet access, citizens are looking for more information about what is going on in their cities and are looking for more ways to hold their government representatives accountable. One of the best ways to provide transparency and make it easier for citizens to obtain the city services they require is to become an open source city. An open source city is one that uses a variety of new tools, including apps, to make information availble to citizens and interact with them as well.

Following are 10 tools to help open source cities maintain transparency. » Read more

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What the future holds for an open source city

open source city

The future for Raleigh, NC as an open global city is very promising. There is a strong, participatory culture that is both leading and adding value to the open source, open government, and open data movements happening across the globe. The elected officials and city staff in Raleigh, particularly the IT staff, are committed to open source and understand the value of open data. This makes the economic future of Raleigh ripe for new businesses and entrepreneurs with ideas that spark innovation. » Read more

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Open Contracting Principles reflect norms and best practices from around the world

open data in government

Authored by Lindsey Marchessault


Over the past year, the Open Contracting Partnership (OCP) has facilitated a global consultation process to create a set of open contracting principles. The principles reflect norms and best practices from around the world related to disclosure and participation in public contracting.

Nearly 200 open contracting collaborators from government, private sector, civil society, donors, and international financial institutions contributed to the discussion from various sector-specific perspectives (such as service delivery, infrastructure, extractive industries, and land).

The resulting Open Contracting Global Principles build on existing norms and conventions related to » Read more

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Observations from this year's NSA Open Source Industry Day

open source control not desirable

I attended the NSA Open Source Industry Day in Maryland this year and thought I'd summarize what did and didn't surprise me. We'll see if these observations prove controversial or helpful! More importantly we'll see if organizations can effectively manage, govern, and secure their applications given the reality of open source, agile development practices, and component-based development.

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NC Datapalooza 2013: Why publicly available data is innovative

open government data

If you live in the southeastern US (aka the Bible Belt) as I do, you’ve probably been to a church revival or two (or twenty). Revival is an event intended to light a fire under the 'faithful,' as opposed to the newcomer. As I sat at NC Datapalooza last week, I felt that I was in a revival, without the obvious religious overtones, of course. I was amazed at how far the Raleigh area has come in terms of understanding and accepting open data principles.

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The US Constitution version 2.0

open government

After 'version 1.0' of the US Constitution was released to the public on Sept 17, 1787 there was remaining discontent among several states regarding the powers assigned to the new Federal government and a lack of protections for fundamental individual freedoms and civil rights.

To fix this bug, the First Continental Congress voted on twelve Constitutional Amendments in September of 1789. Two of them failed to gain enough support and the remaining ten, collectively known as The Bill of Rightswere included in 'version 2.0' of the US Constitution, released in 1791.

This refactoring process was open source-minded on multiple levels. » Read more

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Four tips for building better apps for government

open government apps

Government CIOs have ample resources to do a great job for their communities and citizens. They have smart, well-intentioned people working for them and more low-hanging fruit than most private-sector CIOs dream of.

The biggest problem is not budgetary, legal, or policy constraints, although those sure don’t help much—it's about process. It’s a matter of doing things right from day one. It's a matter of doing less, not more. Government CIOs should be thinking smaller, not bigger; setting their sights lower, not higher; and strategizing away from organization-wide change in favor of quick, tangible wins that we can all share.

4 tips for building new systems and shipping quality code in no time:

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Do you have a cloud exit strategy? Here’s one clear path.

cloud in open government

The federal government’s march to the cloud has, at times, seemed more like a cautious ballet than anything else. While cloud-based projects are slowly rolling out, much of the agency emphasis is on private or community clouds as opposed to public providers. Security and data handling concerns play a role in this "tiptoeing," but another reason is far more insidious: the fear of lock-in.

The Federal Shared Services Implementation Guide, the agency blueprint to the cloud, makes it very clear that government entities engaging in cloud computing need a clear “exit strategy” for anything as a service. It might seem ridiculous to consider how one should migrate from a technology before it is even implemented, but when it comes to the cloud, being able to get your data out is just as important as getting it in. It's about choice and control.

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