Government

Upcoming global discussion on open government, big data, and innovation

open government

The Gigabit City Summit is set to host a diverse, dynamic range of speakers on the topics of open government, big data, and innovation on Tuesday, September 25, 2012 from 7:00 am to 9:00 am CDT.

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Five major standards organizations speak out

open data standards

What's going on at the International Telecommunications Union?

Earlier this month, the IEEE, Internet Architecture Board (IAB), Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF), Internet Society, and World Wide Web Consortium (W3C) signed a joint agreement to affirm and adhere to a set of principles that establish what they call The Modern Paradigm for Standards» Read more

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The latest White House moves on open source: Connecting citizen developers to tools

Open the White House

This week, in the latest step to connect citizen developers with the tools they need to unlock government data, the White House updated their website to include a developers resources section. More than a mere technical reference post, the White House affirmed that: » Read more

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Creative Commons applied to government, business, and journalism

Creative Commons BY

For people wanting to learn about Creative Commons and its application in different sectors, there is a sea of materials available online. In particular, Creative Commons international affiliates create a huge number of educational resources that cross language and cultural boundaries.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about my work sorting through some of these resources to identify some of the best, focusing on Creative Commons license use for public sector information, for publishing content on a variety of digital platforms, and for generating revenue. As promised, today I’ll highlight some of the resources I’ve discovered. » Read more

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Is open source democratic?

community

In his recent post, Glyn Moody asks an important question: "Can open source be democratic?" He describes how free software emerged as a distributed, bottom-up system of writing code. The central defining aspects of that culture are a uniquely open process not just of programming but also of its organization, and a close relationship between programmers and users. Effectively, users and programmers together were both contributors, they collaborated on the project. Glyn goes on to explain how this community effort changed over time to become more institutionalized, more corporate and more dull—"becoming a 'Firefox Affiliate', hardly something that sets the pulse racing." Ordinary users no longer play an important part in open source projects. » Read more

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Can governments crowdsource their brand?

Can governments crowdsource their brand?

A recent poll asked about brand practices for cities and city governments. While the results are still coming in, it's clear that citizens want to be included in this process. Having an open, well-documented process is critical to achieving consensus. But what about the power of crowdsourcing?

Should local governments leverage the power of their citizens and tap into public perception of their city? » Read more

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Can citizens use open source to create legislation?

two-way street sign

In recent weeks we've seen a number of projects in the area of collaborative legislation that operate similarly to open source software. Today, you can find French, German, and Swiss proposals in git repositories. If you're a developer familiar with these tools, it's easy for you to review the patches (bills), submit your own, and collaborate around the code (law). These are exciting projects undertaken by people in many different countries, but very few governing bodies appear to be harnessing their citizens' input. » Read more

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By the numbers: India saves and grows with free and open source software

rupee

Free and open source software (FOSS) plays an indispensable role in developing countries. As it is often a substitute for more expensive proprietary software, it can impact the economy and progress of a country, like India, in a very positive way.

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A time for change: Citizens empowered by open government

open source lightning talks

Do you see government as an institution without much room for growth and change? The open source way is creating a path for citizens to become empowered and help their community make improvements where traditional methods have failed—through active participation, gained knowledge, and a two-way conversation with city officials. » Read more

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Government petitioned to "free the code"

locked up

Open Source for America has asked the White House to "Free the Code," meaning that the U.S. federal government should share government-developed software under an open source license. OSFA's petition has since expired with not enough votes, but stay tuned for future efforts on this issue.

Three top reasons they say the government should mandate open sourcing of custom federal software are:

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