Health

Open IDEO asks: how can social businesses improve the health of low-income communities?

In 2005, during a visit to Paris, Nobel laureate Muhammad Yunus proposed a joint venture to the chairman of Danone (spelled Dannon in the US). The objective was to supply Danone's delicious yogurt to the malnourished children of Bangladesh. They would add micronutrients to the yogurt so that if a child ate two yogurts per week for a year, they would regain full health.
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TEDxChapelHill: Open Source Technologies, Local Engagement, and Innovation for Global Health

Last week, the second annual TEDxChapelHill filled the Varsity Theatre in Chapel Hill, NC. The seven amazing speakers—from the fields of ICT4D (information, communication, and technology for development), mHealth, engineering and design, and medicine—talked about their projects, trials, and vision for the future. They spoke about the critical importance of local involvement, capacity building, end-user engagement, efficiency, a respect for low-tech solutions and high-tech innovative partnerships to make tools affordable and accessible.
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Ozioma puts locally relevant health data in the hands of journalists

Charlene Caburnay from the Health Communications Research Lab presented to the Health Data Initiative Forum today about Ozioma, winner of the Health 2.0 and National Cancer Institute Developer Challenge. » Read more

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Live webcast today: Harnessing the power of data to improve health

Today the Department of Health and Human Services and the Institute of Medicine are holding their second forum to discuss how health data can be used to support healthcare systems and patients in informed decision making.

More than 40 companies will be participating, and the featured speakers include Aneesh Chopra, US CTO; Tim O'Reilly, O’Reilly Media; Matt Miller, NPR; Harvey Fineberg, IOM President; Todd Park, HHS CTO. » Read more

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Opening the field of neurobiological research

What does it take to find a cure for Alzheimer’s? Can we spare returning soldiers from post-traumatic stress disorder?

The moon shot is on collaboration and sharing. And just as in the moon race, the challenge is far too great for a single group to undertake it alone.
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Socrates, social media and the new dialectic

"If I tell you that this is the greatest good for a human being, to engage every day in arguments about virtue and the other things you have heard me talk about, examining both myself and others, and if I tell you the unexamined life is not worth living for a human being, you will be even less likely to believe what I am saying. But that's the way it is."
- Passage from Socrates' famous speech at his trial.

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Liquid data and the health information economy: Is 2011 finally the year?

What a difference three years makes. It seems quaint now that in the 2008 NEJM there were concerns raised about the flow of health information onto the web. Back then there was but a faint trickle of what could be entered, mostly by hand, and accessed on the web. Before HITECH and health care reform, exchanging health data online seemed blasphemous to many hospitals, patients, and physicians alike.

Fast forward to today and where we are now: » Read more

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Open health and medical gag orders

Last week a friend of mine posted on Facebook, “I need a new lawnmower. Any opinions on what I should get?”

She received several responses. One person suggested a goat. Another posted a picture of an attractive shirtless man with bulging muscles gleaming with sweat as he worked in the yard. But others identified the pros and cons of various lawnmower brands for her. Based on those comments and reviews, she went with a Fiskar's momentum reel mower because it "won't need to be repaired."
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Is the future of health patient-driven?

People often share more about their health and medical experiences on Facebook than they do with their own doctors. They talk about their experiences with illness, their symptoms, the medications they're taking, the side effects, what works, what doesn't, even various treatment options.

It turns out this online health chatter can be a lifesaver.
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Can social communities transform clinical trials?

Big pharma is one of the main scapegoats for the steeply rising costs of medical care. This might make sense when you learn how staggering the pricetag on necessary processes—like clinical trials—can be.

According to the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America (PhRMA), the U.S. pharmaceutical industry’s advocacy group, it costs $1.3B (in 2005 dollars) to bring a new drug to market. » Read more

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