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How to build an open source community

open source community

Community is vital to an open source project. An active and supportive community is the heart of the project. However, having an open source licence is not enough to bring users and developers to your project and build a community. This document looks at what makes a successful open source community.

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Creating an eBook using the AsciiDoc markup language

eBook open source way

For manuals and guides, Wikis are an excellent way of organizing content. Yet, they often don't work as well for larger articles or books because individual content is spread across many pages and the reader has to click around. Additionally, when you want to read online content while in a place where you cannot get an Internet connection (like, reading on the plane), another mode of content delivery is needed.

Recently, I was quite thrilled to see Opensource.com offer a thorough and skillful way of How to create an eBook the open source way. But, I am not a big fan of Wysiwig editors and prefer markup languages like LaTeX, Markdown, AsciiDoc, or even Wiki-Markup. So, here I give you an alternative: preparing content for an eBook editing AsciiDoc documents. [You can also do this on the go, in an email editor on your mobile phone or tablet.]

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Weekly wrap-up: New Zealand bans software patents, open source is for lovers, and more

open source news and highlights

Open source news this week: August 25 - 29, 2013


What other open source-related news stories did you read about this week? Share them with us in the comments section. Follow us on Twitter where we share these stories in real time.

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Open discussion from the inside out: A Red Hat intern's experience

open dandelions

I’m a words guy. This summer, I was an intern for the content team—part of the marketing services group at Red Hat. They kept me busy writing copy for ads, editing Red Hat content, brainstorming on different projects, and even scripting videos. They don’t have me writing like a businessman, but like the Shadowman.

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Afraid someone will steal your idea?

release early, release often

I'm a board game designer. It's a fun, creative, scary job and worlds away from my former career in corporate advertising. In both fields, there is a high value placed on ideas, especially "new" ideas. No one wants to get scooped. Be it an ad campaign or a board game, you want to be the first out the door with it.

So it may seem odd that I've spent ten years blogging my game design process. Every one of my harebrained concepts and fully-formed prototypes go up live, viewable by everyone.

The question I get most often is: "Aren't you afraid someone will steal your idea?"

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No major coding experience required: Gaming and more with Ren'Py

open source gaming

Ren'Py, created by Tom Rothamel (@renpytom on Twitter), is an a open source tool for developing visual novels. Visual novels are the computer game equivalent of a "Choose Your Own Adventure" novel. Writing a basic game script is super simple and adding in game/programming logic (using variables, if statements, jumping to a different section of the script, etc.) is not very hard.

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Weekly wrap-up: Groklaw says goodnight, Unix pioneers share memories, and more

open source news and highlights

Open source news this week: August 19 - 23, 2013


What other open source-related news stories did you read about this week? Share them with us in the comments section. Follow us on Twitter where we share these stories in real time.

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New glossary helps break down common open source related terms

open source glossary released

A couple of months ago, I wrote the first draft of "A Free, Libre and Open Glossary." I am often frustrated by people using terms like "open source" and "free software" loosely, even though they have fixed and clear definitions. There is a web of terms, many of them using ambiguous terms like "open" or "crowd," that frequently confuse and blur the issue. » Read more

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Open source culture thrives in Chattanooga

open source city

Last week I had a chance to visit Chattanooga for several days and received an up close look at the maker and entrepreneurial culture of the city. Chattanooga is home to a municipal gigabit fiber installation, which reaches every home and business in a 600 square mile area. The city is positioning itself as a hub of digital innovation, and from where I sit they're doing quite a good job of that. Some of the smartest minds from other parts of the country are moving to Chattanooga because of the quality of life combined with structural community support for innovators.

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Can there be open source music?

Gratis and libre

Open source software has come a long way since the moniker "open source" was first coined in 1998. The Cathedral and the Bazaar helped to explain this new paradigm of software production, and history has proven that the profound implications predicted by Raymond’s essay were not only credible, but now also obvious. And perhaps because of the open source software community’s awesome record of success, those who work outside the strict boundaries of software development have started to wonder: Are there new paradigms, based on open source principles, that could rock our world, too? » Read more

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