Life

The elusive book publishing process: A little risk, a little reward

Publishing the open source way

My favorite thing about the Internet is the way it makes so many of us into storytellers. It turns people on to sharing their own experiences, especially experiences they might be uncomfortable relating in person. My enthusiasm for the Internet’s encouragement of transparency extends beyond digital confessionals and group therapy and well into the mundane: instruction manuals; wikis packed with the sort of minutiae one used to have to wait to overhear at a cocktail party; and the open listserv a friend maintained as a shared journal, where my every entry addressed the lone lurker no one knew (but who seemed to be named Paul and kept showing up in the output of a REVIEW DIARY-L).

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Poll: Which Linux board would you use to create your next project?

open hardware

Recently, we compared Raspberry Pi, Allwinner and CuBox Linux hardware boards. » Read more

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Community lessons from architecture and urban planning

open source lightning talks

Dave Neary manages open source standards at Red Hat, so he thinks a lot about what makes open source communities work and what makes them unique.

First, everything we are doing in open source is not brand new. People have gone before us; we should take notice of the lessons they learned and learn them ourselves. Then, two books, one about architecture and the other city planning, highlight key guidelines for design and process. » Read more

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Open source music-making lab resonates in the Congo

open source music

In July this year, two UNC-Chapel Hill professors trained 16 motivated Congolese students in the art of beat making. They called their group The Congo Beat Making Lab and collaborated with Yole!Africa to strengthen a larger goal they all share: to connect people (including musicians) around the world.

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The automotive industry accelerates its Linux commitment

Open source automobiles

The automotive industry took a major step forward in its commitment to open source yesterday, as announced by the Linux Foundation. The Automotive Grade Linux Workgroup (AGL) is a new group that will facilitate industry collaboration for Linux development.

Major automotive companies like Jaguar Land Rover, Nissan and Toyota are some of the first carmakers to participate in AGL. Other members include Aisin AW, DENSO Corporation, Feuerlabs, Fujitsu, HARMAN, Intel, NEC, NVIDIA, Reaktor, Renesas, Samsung, Symbio, Texas Instruments Incorporated, and Tieto. » Read more

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Time to grab Humble Indie Bundle Six's $86 worth of games

Humble Bundle website

The clock is ticking on your 13 days to grab the six games in this edition of the Humble Indie Bundle, a pay-what-you-will collection of games with the benefits going to the Electronic Frontier Foundation and Child's Play. Your loot this time around includes the DRM-free games and soundtracks for:

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Multiseat computing can feed a multitude

open wires

The ancient alchemists tried to turn iron into gold. While they didn't succeed, they did leave us with a wonderful metaphor. Last week I experienced something akin to alchemy when I installed Fedora 17 onto a donated Dell Dimension 3000 tower computer.

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Creative Commons applied to government, business, and journalism

Creative Commons BY

For people wanting to learn about Creative Commons and its application in different sectors, there is a sea of materials available online. In particular, Creative Commons international affiliates create a huge number of educational resources that cross language and cultural boundaries.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about my work sorting through some of these resources to identify some of the best, focusing on Creative Commons license use for public sector information, for publishing content on a variety of digital platforms, and for generating revenue. As promised, today I’ll highlight some of the resources I’ve discovered. » Read more

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Creating better art for open source games

Liberated Pixel Cup

For those of you that missed it, the Liberated Pixel Cup is a gaming contest where the goal is to make free software art and free software games that use said art. It was sponsored this past June and July by Creative Commons, the Free Software Foundation, Open Game Art, Mozilla, and many individuals. 

While we're still waiting on the actual results and winners of the contest, this two-part article will take a comprehensive look at the assets produced (Part I) and the games developed (Part II).

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Using open source for disaster response planning

Using open source for disaster response planning

Peak hurricane season is always a reminder that natural disasters are never easy to handle. If there’s anything we can take away from them it’s that planning and preparedness can save the lives of those risk. The World Bank and OpenGeo find themselves at the unique cross section of disaster management and enabling technology. OpenGeo's software is built to share information on on the web, which is a critical component of any disaster management plan. Various implementations of our software have been used to facilitate strategic disaster management planning.
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