Life

Top 10 posts from Opensource.com in February 2014

The top ten monthly highlights

We had a stellar February and a new record for Opensource.com bringing in 325,775 page views and 219,300 unique visits. We finished our Women in Open Source Week at the beginning of the month, then featured Beginners in Open Source Week. These stories were gathered from developers, designers, educators, and more in the open source community who may not have considered sharing their story before but were encouraged to do so because of our focus on "women" and "beginners" in open source. » Read more

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Public schools lack of bandwidth needs attention

networking and open source in schools

The Software & Information Industry Association (SIIA) estimates the US market for pre-K to 12th grade educational software and digital content to be over $7.96 billion USD. Testing and assessment comprise the largest category and a 35% growth rate from last year. » Read more

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How open source cartography pays the bills for one company

design and publish beautiful maps

Down what appears to be an alley just large enough to drive a delivery truck, Mapbox's Washington, DC office is tucked into its surroundings much like their contributions to the open source cartography world: integrated without shouting. Only their trademark hexagon globe sign will let you know that you've arrived at the proper location. Once inside the unassuming office, you'll find yourself standing in the middle of their work zone. Making their home in an old garage, the first floor is full of computers and people working diligently to churn out tools and data to be used by the world's masses, all in what can only be described as a silence found only in a library. What's being produced here affects many of the mainstream and up-and-coming mobile applications found on many a smartphone. » Read more

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12 videos to you get started with open source software

How-to videos for getting started with open source software

Getting started with new software can be overwhelming. It's even more frustrating when you transition from one tool to another, because you have to unlearn some habits in order to make room for new ones. But, there are huge benefits to switching from closed software to open source alternatives. » Read more

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Open source summer internships, new tools for online education, and more

open source news and highlights

Open source news for your reading pleasure.

February 24 - 28, 2014

In this week's edition of our open source news roundup, we look at Munich's progress in dumping proprietary software, privacy on Mozilla's mobile Firefox OS, and more.

» Read more

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Nothing To Hide: An anti-stealth game in which you are your own watchdog

open source game

Nothing To Hide is an "anti-stealth game," in which you must carry cameras and spy gear to live in a world of self-surveillance and self-censorship. A world where you're made to be your own watchdog. Released for The Day We Fight Back, the game is now seeking crowdfunding to complete the open source game—10% of what's raised will first go to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Demand Progress, and the Freedom of the Press Foundation. » Read more

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Open Hardware Week kicks off March 17

open hardware week

Complete list of Open Hardware Week articles

When you see this image on an article, it is part of our full list of Open Hardware Week stories. Share with friends at #oshweek. » Read more

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Things newcomers to open source rarely ask but often wonder

newbies to open source

Open Source Comes to Campus is an event series run by OpenHatch that introduces college students to open source tools, projects, and culture. Whenever we get a new-to-us question at an event, we write it down and answer it more fully on our blog. Here’s a collection of "Infrequently Asked Questions" that are especially relevant for newcomers to open source projects. » Read more

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Get more contributors to your project with better documentation

share documentation to code

It is not uncommon to have a cycle of news around communities being unfriendly to women or newcomers or people who aren't already there. By 'news' I mean someone posts something that is close to their heart about some unjustice and other people comment on it or write their own posts and generally, the moral of the story is: But we should be better than this!

This is normal and desired behavior as part of the overall community. This cycle is a good thing because it causes people to think about their behavior as community members and what it's like to be an outsider and how they can improve. These are all positive steps because it springs from an honest desire to be better people. That's awesome. » Read more

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Crowdsourcing the OpenStack Summit agenda

Collaborative agenda setting

The OpenStack Foundation recently launched their voting tool for rating presentation proposals for the OpenStack Summit in Atlanta, May 12-16. While the chairs for each track make the final decisions about which presentation topics make the cut, voting is a great way for the community to get involved and participate in the agenda-setting process.

Conference talks are proposed from a variety of different individuals with different corporate affiliations and different relationships to the OpenStack project. Listing all of them here would be difficult, but in keeping with the theme of our Beginners in Open Source Week, here are a few that might appeal to beginners: » Read more

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