Life

Talk like a digital pirate--or fight against them--on Talk Like A Pirate Day

To celebrate Talk Like a Pirate Day the opensource.com way, we gathered a list of things that have been said through the history of copyright, copying, remixing, and the sort of piracy that doesn't involve tricorn hats or cutlasses.


"Music and gymnastic (must) be preserved in their original form, and no innovation made. They must do their utmost to maintain them intact. [...]

     for any musical innovation is full of danger in the whole State,
     and ought to be prohibited. » Read more

2 Comments

SPARKcon: Igniting creative thinkers with open source

SPARKcon: Organizing creative thinkers with open source

How do you celebrate the creativity of your community without falling into a rigid planning process? You open source it. By tapping into individuals' passions, their willingness to collaborate, and creating a culture of transparency, you can light a spark that will inspire unpredictable--yet reproducible--results. » Read more

1 Comment

Poll: Should every city and airport have free wifi?

Open wifi

Whether you travel often or just occasionally, paying for wireless is something many of us face. Whether it's at airports or hotels, many people opt to use a free network first.

Some cities and airports are starting to provide free wireless to the public. Is this a new trend? Are the days of paying for wireless access coming to an end?

Let us know what you think.

4 Comments

Should setting information free get you locked up? Aaron Swartz, JSTOR, and the theft of information

Aaron Swartz is 25 years old. He’s smart, tenacious, talented. And, in the view of the US Attorney General, a dangerous man currently charged with wire and computer fraud, obtaining information from a protected computer, and criminal forfeiture. He was released pending a September trial on a $100,000 bond.

His crime? Downloading more than four million documents from the JSTOR digital library. » Read more

24 Comments

From the TouchPad's ashes rises the phoenix of open source

HP's attempt to kill the TouchPad proved two things: the appeal of a $99 tablet and the power of open source communities.

The first is clear--even if you hadn't decided how a tablet would fit into your life, it's a lot easier to figure it out for $99 than for $500. Too bad the BOM to build the TouchPad was more than $300. (Maybe it's time to subsidize tablets.) » Read more

3 Comments

Free as in sake: The story of Koji

Koji is an open source build system. While many are familiar with Koji because of the Fedora Project's use of it, Koji is a generic system that is used by different groups around the world. » Read more

5 Comments

Mårten Mickos: "F" as in freedom, and in fun, and in the future

If you haven't heard a keynote about the wonders of the cloud, you haven't been to an open source conference lately. But Mårten Mickos' LinuxCon cloud keynote was more than that--it was really a freedom keynote.

"FOSS has an 'F' as in freedom, and in fun, and the future," Mickos said. "Many of us do it because of 'F' as in fun. But we have a duty to civilization to protect freedom--to protect that what we open, others don't close." » Read more

1 Comment

Maddog, Moglen, and Frye: Icons of the Linux community discuss their first twenty years with Linux and its future

In the afternoon keynotes of the first day of LinuxCon, Linux Foundation Executive Director Jim Zemlin sat down to talk about the twentieth anniversary of Linux with Jon "Maddog" Hall, Eben Moglen, and Dan Frye, or as Zemlin called them, The Godfather, The Lawyer, and The Suit. » Read more

2 Comments

Jim Whitehurst on the next twenty years of Linux

Open source leader Jim Whitehurst, Red Hat CEO

LinuxCon 2011 kicked off this morning with a retrospective from Jim Zemlin, executive director of the Linux Foundation, on the accomplishments of Linux in its first twenty years. Self-professed geek and Red Hat CEO Jim Whitehurst, whose Linux use started with Slackware in the late 90s, followed by Fedora, followed Zemlin with a keynote addressing the next 20 years of Linux. » Read more

0 Comments