Life

Anniversary edition t-shirt giveaway: Follow us on Twitter or identi.ca

NOTE: THIS GIVEAWAY HAS ENDED.

As our first anniversary approaches, we wanted to thank everyone who has followed us on Twitter and identi.ca. Not only are they the first place many of you see when we've posted new stories, but they've also been a great tool for us to meet like minds and find stories of open source in the world. » Read more

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Vote for the 2010 People's Choice Award

On January 25, opensource.com will reach its one-year anniversary. As a part of the celebration, we want you to choose your favorite opensource.com contributor for the 2010 People's Choice Award.

Voting will be open through January 27, 2011, and the winner will be announced on January 28, 2011.

Voting is now closed.

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Google kills H.264 in Chrome

The Internet reacted to yesterday's post on the Chromium blog with astounding speed. What caused the hubbub? » Read more

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Open source returns integrity to science

Imagine it is 1912, but that the Titanic is fitted with an underwater radar system. Imagine that it senses an iceberg so large that even the captain can understand that by the law of conservation of momentum, the ship will be stopped in its path. Should the captain use the radar information to inform the decision to alter course, or should the captain ignore it because radar is merely an invention of science therefore prone to exaggeration and false findings? » Read more

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Open source film making with Todd Harris

Canadian documentary filmmaker Todd Harris gets up close and personal with the communities he films. He is especially attracted to stories that involve an underdog fighting for justice against government and corporate interests, where he can cover a side of the conflict that is usually untouched by mainstream media. Until a few years ago, he restricted himself to issues that were particular to Canada. Now he plans to extend his research into the international realm.

I first noticed Todd two years ago at the infamous Dump Site 41 protest in the Georgian Bay area of Ontario, Canada, as he casually surfed the crowd, sometimes talking, sometimes filming. But it wasn't until his film aired at Georgian College one blustery night in December 2010 that I realized who he was. » Read more

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Transparency in energy usage

I'm pretty passionate about renewable energy. After I read Thomas L. Friedman's "Hot, Flat, and Crowded" I was sold on higher prices for gas and putting solar panels on every roof in America. In fact, I was so eager to contribute, I had 18 solar panels installed on the roof of my home.

When I was checking out the energy infographic, "Interactive Transparency: America's Energy, Where It's From and How It's Used" over at GOOD, I was re-energized on the topic of renewable and sustainable energy.

I couldn't agree more with GOOD's opening statement: » Read more

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Anti-openness gifts: An open advocate's confessions

For my birthday several months ago, I got a Kindle. No fewer than three people have since asked me, "What are you doing with a Kindle? It's not very open source-y."

Confession: I love my Kindle. I only have one book to carry when I travel. I can play games. And it let me tweet from Paris over free 3G from Open World Forum, where cell data was expensive and, like many conferences, the wifi was shaky. Surely that counts for something?

But the accusers are right. It's not very "open source-y." The DRM is painful and prevents sharing. » Read more

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Mashing up library data with open source

When I was approached nearly five years ago now and asked to put together an edited work on how libraries can use mashups to improve services, I have to admit that I was a bit disappointed that the topic wasn't going to be open source software instead. Before the ink had even dried on my mashups book though I was offered the opportunity I wanted, a book on open source software for libraries. Now when I'm asked to speak at conferences and events the topic of interest is either open source or mashups, but never both. While there are of course differences in these two types of technologies, there are also similarities. » Read more

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Open*Life: 2010 in review

What a great year on the Open*Life channel here at opensource.com. We had more than 150 posts covering how open source touches our lives. This is our year in review--a time to reflect on what happened over the last year and a chance to look forward to next year.

I'd first like to thank all the authors and readers who contributed articles, thoughts, comments, reviews, artwork, feedback, and all the work that goes on behind the scenes to post an article on the site. It's truly a community effort. We are always looking for new authors, ideas for content, and improvement.

In 2011, we are looking to cover more topics on open source in our lives. We look forward to hearing more of your ideas. Let's take a look back at 2010 and see our top 10 posts, a few of my favorites, and my editor picks. » Read more

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Poll: Open*Life 2010 best images

catalyst system

The visual components on opensource.com are an important element to the look and feel of our content. The images help set the tone for the site. The imagery embodies several qualities such as motivational, editorial, authoritative (but not authoritarian), human, and optimism.

Without our imagery, the content on the site would be plain and unsightly. We'd like to highlight some of the images from 2010 and give you a chance to pick your favorite. » Read more

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