accountability

Open data done well is a catalyst for change

Open data

In March 2012 I reported in a post entitled “Open by design” a paper by Harlan Yu and David Robinson entitled “The New Ambiguity of Open Government“. A discussion of the paper has now appeared on the World Bank blog by Anupama Dokeniya entitled “Opening Government Data. But Why?” [A thank you to Jacques Raybaut at en.europa-eu-audience for the heads-up]. This is also even more relevant given the UK Public Accounts Committee report back so recently which was linked to and commented upon in Transparent e-gov. » Read more

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An open source political party?

An open source political party?

That's the same question that crossed my mind when I came across this site. Highlighted in green at the top, "Liberty, Democracy, Transparency!" So far so good. But is this for real? » Read more

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Building stronger public schools: problem solved?

60 Minutes did a segment on The Equity Project (TEP). TEP is a charter school that is publicly funded and privately run in New York City by founder and principal Zeke Vanderhoek. The goal of TEP is to prove that attracting the best teachers and holding them accountable for results is essential to a school’s success. And guess what else—Vanderhoek also rewards these top-tier educators with salaries around $125,000 per year. » Read more

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Leadership in open source communities

Leadership in most organizations is top-down. The CEO tells the VP, who tells the director, who tells the manager, who instructs his employee to do work. Culturally most people are conditioned to think that's expected. But open source communities rarely work that way, and that's one of the oddities people discover upon getting involved in open source--and often they need a period of acclimation to get used to it. It’s also certainly one of the strengths of open source communities, as well as one of the least understood functions, even among those in communities of practice. » Read more

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To tweet or not to tweet: How companies are reining in social media

Social media like Facebook, Twitter, or LinkedIn enable ordinary people to do international live broadcasting. It's little wonder companies worry about the potential damage to their brand or reputation from wayward tweeting employees, and I am told many a celebrity's agent has considered adding a “no drinking and tweeting” clause to his contract. Here's a look at how some companies are writing (and rewriting) their social media policies to deal with the risks they face. » Read more

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Cooperative principles can be applied in school settings

Most schools today involve rows of students seated at desks, looking toward a teacher. That teacher, who is the focus of all the students, holds the power in the classroom, but has little power to make structural changes within the school system. The educational system in the United States right now is set up to teach kids how to follow directions—and it's not doing that very well, either. Our students learn how to break the rules and not get caught. » Read more

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Does your organization need a "no policy" policy?

Daniel Pink published an interesting piece over the weekend in The Telegraph about Netflix's innovative corporate policy of not having a vacation policy. » Read more

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