artists

What artists want in software: An ode to Dream Studio

open source why

I am an artist and the sole maintainer of Dream Studio, a free and open source creative system (on SourceForge). Though most of the software is maintained by others who maintain their own Ubuntu PPAs, which are included with Dream Studio by default (which is, itself, based on standard desktop Ubuntu), I create the default themes and overall look of Dream Studio, package the various multimedia categories, create the installer disc (and Dream Studio for Ubuntu), and write a couple of the programs and scripts included with the distribution.

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How open source is disrupting visual art

hands

If you’ve seen an unbelievable interactive projection or a mind-blowing piece of generative video art, odds are you’ve come across openFrameworks, an accessible programming platform that has helped create projects like Arturo Castro and » Read more

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What Creative Commons and 'copyleft' mean to a designer

Creative Commons design mash up

I recently graduated in May, and I had not heard of Creative Commons until I came to work at Red Hat. After a few months, I had gained some familiarity with Creative Commons but it was only when I was recently asked to create images for their 10th Anniversary that I realized I had some research to do.  » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music —Part 3: If I could turn forward time...

Imagine a 20-year-old musician publishing his work today. Let's pretend he's living the fast and reckless life of a rock star and will die young at 45. Because the copyright term has been ratcheted up to life of the author plus 70 years (or 95 years from publication for corporate works), you won't be able to sample his work without permission (for your heartfelt tribute song, of course), until 2105. But since you're not living his rock star lifestyle, maybe you can hang on another 95 years to grab your chance. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 2: Copyright jams

Our society and its lawmakers are notoriously bad at predicting the effects of new technologies. I think of the ongoing battles over new distribution formats, like the assumption that "the VCR [would be] to the American film producer and the American public as the Boston strangler is to the woman home alone." Jennifer Jenkins, one of the authors of Theft! A History of Music, has an even more basic and older example: musical notation. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music—Part 1: Plato and all that jazz

Why did Plato argue that remixing should be banned by the state? What threats did jazz and rock 'n roll pose? And what does all of that mean for the conflicts between artists and copyright today? » Read more

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Beautiful technology: The Open Source Satellite Initiative

Song hojun is an engineer.

His background is electrical engineering and computer science--he completed his Master's at ICU Engineering in Korea. He works on things like satellites and sophisticated machines designed to avert war. » Read more

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Fund-raising and self-publishing (the open source way): Part I

In the first half of this two-part series, author, artist, and hard-working mom Beverly Pearl discusses the challenges (and rewards) of creating of a collaborative, inexpensive, self-published art show book with open source tools. This project provides a way for the artists and community to work together, gain new skills, and deliver a professional-looking product—while hopefully raising some money for a good cause. » Read more

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Abstract Logix: Changing the music experience for everyone with the open source way

Abstract Logix is changing the music industry experience for musicians, fans, and retailers. How? By embracing the open source way and using a community-focused and collaborative approach.

We interviewed Souvik Dutta, founder of Abstract Logix, to get a better understanding of how the open source way is helping to create a stable business and how they produce, distribute, and promote music collaboratively. Abstract Logix helps to enable gifted musicians around the world spread their audio art. They offer a groomed selection of innovative music from artists who are rarely represented in traditional retail shops.

How do they do this? » Read more

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