book review

Opensource.com Annual Reading List
Introducing this year's list Open source projects and practices have always enjoyed a complicated relationship to change. To change is to productively evolve. Working transparently and collaboratively excellerates the speed at which we can build wonderful things together. It also allows us to fail... Read more
11 comments Posted 24 Jun 2014 by Bryan Behrenshausen (Red Hat) Feed
Arduino open electronics
"When you go to a store and buy an electronic gizmo, does it ever occur to you that you could make one yourself? Or even that it would be FUN to make one yourself?" This is how John Baichtal's Arduino for Beginners: Essential Skills Every Maker Needs begins, and that same curiosity and ingenuity... Read more
3 comments Posted 26 Mar 2014 by Michael Harrison (Red Hat) Feed
open up book review
Following up on the recent review of the Maker's Manifesto, I ran across the book Makers: The New Industrial Revolution by Chris Anderson. Anderson is a former Editor in Chief of Wired and no stranger to the economic paradoxes of peer-production and open source. He has written about both in... Read more
2 comments Posted 17 Mar 2014 by Luis Ibanez Feed
learn
Scratch is a free educational programming language for kids, available in 50 different languages and runs on just about any modern computer: Linux, Macintosh, or Windows. The new guide book, Super Scratch Programming Adventure!, was authored by The LEAD Project (Learning through Engineering, Art,... Read more
1 comment Posted 8 Oct 2012 by Phil Shapiro Feed
By the end of 2010, more than 400 million works had been licensed with Creative Commons licenses. That's 400 million musical compositions, news items, academic manuscripts, artworks, blueprints, presentations, photographs, books, blog posts, and videos whose owners believed traditional copyright... Read more
2 comments Posted 14 Jul 2011 by Bryan Behrenshausen (Red Hat) Feed
We live in a consumer culture in the most literal sense of that word. We aren't just making purchases. We are consuming. And more than just consuming, we are obliterating our world's resources at an alarming rate. We've become accustomed--and hungry for--changing styles with the change of seasons.... Read more
1 comment Posted 21 Sep 2010 by Ruth Suehle (Red Hat) Feed