business models

Can IBM expect the same ROI from next round of investment in Linux?

return on investment

At the most recent LinxuCon, IBM announced it will invest $1B in Linux and related open source technologies over the next five years.

This is not the first time IBM has made such a significant commitment to Linux. Back in 2000, IBM invested $1B and dedicated about 1,500 engineers to work on Linux. That investment paid off handsomely: by 2003 IBM was already getting returns of about $2B per year by revitalizing its mainframe business. Deploying Linux on IBM servers had made the offering a lot more attractive for organizations interested in keeping control of their data centers. By 2003, IBM's revenue from Linux related services grew to be twice as much the revenue of patents licensing: a hint for the business models that make the most sense in a knowledge economy.

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Open source code and business models: More than just a license

Open source strategy and business models

As an organization or even individual there always seem to be questions when considering whether or not to make your project or code snippet open source. Many times, it starts with trying to figure out which license to use. But there are many other things to consider. We derived a list for you the next time you ask yourself: Should I open source my code? » Read more

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Open Hardware Summit open to hybrid models

Wired editor-in-chief Chris Anderson

If there was an overarching message from the speakers at last week's Open Hardware Summit, particularly those in the first morning block, it's that openness isn't that critical. It sounds strange coming from a conference whose name starts with "open," but speaker after speaker talked about hybrids and doing whatever worked, not just doing what was open. » Read more

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Four insights to selling and marketing open source software

Open for business

In the last 15 years of my career I have worked at several open source software companies, each with its own unique approach to software delivery, packaging, branding, and sales. Two things have become clear to me: » Read more

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Digital magazines, the new media, and why HP’s $99 tablet could spark a digital renaissance

Digital magazines, the new media, and why HP’s $99 tablet could spark a digital

So, unless you had your head in the sand, you probably noticed HP’s Touchpad tablet computers flying off the shelves of stores after the company slashed the price to $99 ($149 for the 32GB model) and announced that it was discontinuing the product line. » Read more

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OSCON round-up: Open source isn't declining. It's maturing.

Reading some stories recently, it would be easy to conclude that there was some sort of a decline in open source. I'll not pretend to have new and objective data on the subject, but having just returned from OSCON in the USA I have to say rumours of the death of open source are premature. » Read more

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Free vs Paid Business Models webcast: More audience questions answered

During our Free vs. Paid Business Models webcast, we had a lot of questions from the audience—more than our guests had time to answer. Nicolas Pujol generously took a few more minutes of his time to answer these followups. » Read more

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Balancing transparency and privacy

One of the keys to a successful open source community is appropriate transparency. A community with strong values around transparency will also be likely to respect its participants privacy. Such a community will also be unlikely to have a copyright assignment benefiting a commercial party. Here's why.

An open source community arises from the synchronization of the individual interest of many parties. Each person: » Read more

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Conflicts in open source business models

I can't imagine a world in which compromise and collaboration could be more important than in an open source business model. The model itself opens a Pandora's Box of issues that create a minefield that must be navigated on a daily basis and makes those concepts critical to success. Think, for an instance, about a world in which one or many of the possible points of differentiation are freely shared—and some even given away—without condition to parties whose interests are naturally misaligned with yours. » Read more

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Fortune cookie says: To succeed, you must share.

The last time you ate Chinese food, you probably weren't thinking about open source development. But according to Jennifer 8. Lee, author of “The Fortune Cookie Chronicles,” the food on your plate arrived there in precisely that way.

General Tso's chicken? Unrecognizable to its creator, let alone the General's relatives. Swap out the butter and vanilla for sesame and miso in that most famous of Chinese desserts, the fortune cookie, and you have something that closely resembles tsujiura senbei, a Japanese fortune cracker. Americans will be sad to learn that much of the rest of the world—including China—is rather unfamiliar with this delicacy. » Read more

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