cc0

Nothing To Hide: An anti-stealth game in which you are your own watchdog

open source game

Nothing To Hide is an "anti-stealth game," in which you must carry cameras and spy gear to live in a world of self-surveillance and self-censorship. A world where you're made to be your own watchdog. Released for The Day We Fight Back, the game is now seeking crowdfunding to complete the open source game—10% of what's raised will first go to the Electronic Frontier Foundation (EFF), Demand Progress, and the Freedom of the Press Foundation. » Read more

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Creative Commons enables the return of the game Glitch

open source game art and code

If you never had a chance to play the delightful Flash-based MMO game Glitch—soon to be rescued from the pit of dead games thanks to Creative Commons assets—I'll let its new tenders explain: » Read more

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Download Nick Liow's Open Game Art Bundle

game on teamwork

Indie videogame designer Nick Liow launched the Open Game Art Bundle in June this year. It was a simple idea: independent videogame designers contribute game assets—animations, soundtracks, character designs—and customers can pay any price they want to access them.

Nick describes it as a sort of cross between Kickstarter and Humble Bundle, and like Humble Indie Bundle, the income is split between the developers themselves and charities (including Creative Commons). But there was one big twist: if the bundle reached its goal of $10,000 by July 15, all assets would become public domain under the CC0 public domain declaration.

Well, it did—raising $12,088 from 744 backers. That means you can now download all the packages in this bundle.

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Creative Commons plaintext licenses and using CC0 for software

Creative Commons posted two pieces to their blog today regarding their licenses, and in particular, CC0, the Creative Commons public domain notice.

Plaintext versions of Creative Commons licenses

The Creative Commons licenses are now available in plaintext form: » Read more

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Public Domain Mark: A Creative Commons effort to tag the public domain

Earlier this month, Creative Commons asked for comment on the new Public Domain Mark (PDM), "a tool that would make it easy for people to tag and find content already in the public domain."

The tag is meant to work alongside the CC0 public domain waiver. It's not meant as a license or legal instrument--merely as a label to help people find public domain works.
» Read more

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