code

Get more contributors to your project with better documentation

share documentation to code

It is not uncommon to have a cycle of news around communities being unfriendly to women or newcomers or people who aren't already there. By 'news' I mean someone posts something that is close to their heart about some unjustice and other people comment on it or write their own posts and generally, the moral of the story is: But we should be better than this!

This is normal and desired behavior as part of the overall community. This cycle is a good thing because it causes people to think about their behavior as community members and what it's like to be an outsider and how they can improve. These are all positive steps because it springs from an honest desire to be better people. That's awesome. » Read more

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Get started in open source online and offline

exploring code

What skills do you need and which projects should you participate in as beginner in open source?

These are common questions for beginners to open source software, hardware, communities, and methodologies. New folks to open source can start their discovery online and offline. Events and projects of many different kinds will help beginners find what they are good at and allow them to get to know their own skills. » Read more

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We all need to take it offline now and then

get offline

We're at a particularly interesting time in technology, the Internet, the open source movements, and what accessibility means. We get the ability to be a lot of different people that were not possible before: web designer, cloud architect, open source project manager, open source developer, and more. Working from home is viable with an Internet connection in a way that wasn’t available in the early 1990s. And, when was the last time you looked at the Yellow Pages? (I was on vacation in the Bahamas and was curious. That was it for me.)

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10 ways to contribute to an open source project without writing code

trust in open source projects

What are the ways we can give to an open source community without contributing code?

A recent comment to an Opensource.com article a career in open source went something like that they wanted to contribute to open source but lacked coding skills. In fact, code contributions are very helpful and welcome for most open source projects, but there are a lot of other ways to contribute. » Read more

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Why children should learn to code, even if they don't have a future in IT

Teaching your children open source skills

By day, Red Hat product manager Burr Sutter works to make developers more successful and productive with open source tools, technologies, and techniques. So it's no surprise that he wants to ensure his own children know how to solve technical problems as well. So when summer vacation rolled around this year, Sutter encouraged his son to complete some courses on CodeAcademy and to sign up for a couple of iD Tech Camps.

In this interview, Sutter talks about why he wants his children to know how to fix the tech tools they use every day, how he balances that with other "kid" activities, and more. Parents who are looking for a way to get their children to learn code, to fix their computers, or just learn how online communities work may pick up some tips from Sutter's experiences. » Read more

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Open source programs to get more kids to code

open source coding

At OSCON this year, Regina ten Bruggencate and Kim Spiritus gave a talk called How To Get More Kids To Code. I got in late (I was waiting in line to get a free signed copy of The Art of Community by Jono Bacon) so I missed the beginning of this session, but came in as they were demoing Scratch. This is a website where kids can play little games (available in 40 languages) and then click the 'See inside' button to see the code behind the game in a kid friendly way. It’s a great way to get kids to see code and learn not just programming, but the concepts of open source.

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Don't break the sharing chain of code

share quality code

Sharing is easy. Everyday we have faster, easier and many more ways to do it. Sharing is also important. They say happiness gets bigger when it’s shared, as sorrow gets smaller. We share everyday and we feel good about it. We share our knowledge about an issue, we share advice when needed, and we share our opinion on all sorts of things.

But the best thing about sharing is when our friends also share their points of view, giving everyone a better vision of the topic and enriching each another through a new perspective.

Sharing code is similar.

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Open source downloads are an endangered species

Change the model

With recent news that GitHub is banning storage of any file over 100Mb and discouraging files larger than 50Mb, their retreat from offering download services is complete. It's not a surprising trend; dealing with downloads is unrewarding and costly. » Read more

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Learning to program, the open source way

Tech Kaleidoscope

Kushal Das thinks he knows what you're doing this summer: joining him and his team of volunteers in free, online programming classes, where you'll learn more than just how to code. In Kushal's hands, you'll also receive a crash course in the open source way.

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Make something amazing on the web during Mozilla's 2013 Maker Party

Books to learn how to use the web

Think back to the first thing you created on the web. For me, it was making a Geocities homepage when I was a teenager (Hollywood, represent). I was amazed that by writing HTML, I could make images of the Green Bay Packers and my favorite PEZ dispensers appear on a web site with my witty commentary.

My self-taught childhood HTML skills laid the foundation for my life on the web. Instead of merely consuming information online, I was armed at an early age with the basic skills needed to create content myself. » Read more

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