collaboration - Page number 14

Is crowdsourcing the enemy of innovation?

Is crowdsourcing the enemy of innovation? Four panelists shared their experiences in a SXSW panel this morning.

"Crowdsourcing is a blunt instrument," said Robson Grieve, moderator and president of Creature, which recently redesigned the Seattle's Best logo, resulting in quite a bit of customer reaction, similar to many recent logo changes from The Gap to Tropicana to Starbucks. Crowdsourcing encompasses a lot of ideas and practices that have a little bit in common.

Do we work for the crowd now? » Read more

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Nike improving the environment and communities the open source way

This morning at SXSW, Andrew Zolli, curator of PopTech, talked to Hannah Jones, the VP of Sustainable Business at Nike about innovation, design, and sustainability through open data and collaboration.

The age of singularities
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Great minds don't think alike: Diversity in your collaboration

On opensource.com, we talk a lot about collaboration without talking about a key ingredient for getting the maximum benefit from it: diversity. Without diversity within a collaborative group, the result is a larger quantity of the same thinking rather than the sort of dynamic interaction that creates new ideas. Joe Gerstandt addressed this problem in his SXSW talk, Great Minds Do Not Think Alike." » Read more

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True collaboration embraces conflict

Effective collaboration is essential for creating value. Indeed, it's one of the reasons we create corporations, because organizations are more effective than individuals at allocating resources. But knowing and doing are two different things. As organizations grow, collaboration can suffer—particularly across silos, as people learn to work for the benefit of their own group rather than the whole. This lost potential in collaboration is a huge, untapped source of competitive advantage, one that executives appear to be aware of. » Read more

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What do you want to ask 1,200 CS professors?

With only 1 day to go before SIGCSE, the "Special Interest Group in Computer Science Education" conference and the largest CS education conference in the world, my inbox has been filling with invitations to do this, see that, visit this booth, enter this raffle. For an introvert and first-time SIGCSE attendee like me, it's all a little overwhelming. » Read more

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SXSWi: The open agenda

SXSW Interactive gets started this week, and there are a lot of sessions on the agenda with topics related to the open source way. Music collaboration, open government, Creative Commons... nearly every time slot has at least one session I want to tell opensource.com readers about. Below is my "open agenda" for the week with a quick summary based on the abstracts available. I know there are things I'm missing--feel free to leave comments with sessions you think should be on the list or places I should check out. » Read more

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Education reform wars: Caricaturization, not disagreement, is the problem

I live in the middle of an ideological war zone.

Wake County Public School System is the eighth largest school district in the United States, and one of the mostly highly regarded. But lately it's not been our graduation rate or test scores that make the headlines. It's the school board's decision to end a highly regarded socioeconomic integration program. » Read more

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Bringing information sharing to healthcare

Sharing health information like diagnoses, lab tests, or prescriptions easily and securely has been a huge challenge for doctors, hospitals, and patients. In fact, many in the healthcare industry still exchange information by mail or fax.

The Direct Project works to bring healthcare into the computer age, improving patient care and curbing costs by helping people share information more effectively. » Read more

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How does open source affect company culture?

An open source company is naturally a company that produces open source code for others to consume. But how does the notion of producing software code in the open affect company culture? » Read more

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Advancing student achievement through labor-management collaboration

The U.S. Department of Education just wrapped up a two-day conference, touted as a first-of-its-kind summit among teachers and their bosses—school board members and administrators—in an effort to get these historically opposing groups to work together to improve the nation's schools.

About 150 school districts from 40 states sent teachers and administrators to the summit so that school labor and management could talk about student achievement and learn from the successes and challenges of others, rather than to rehash the nuts and bolts of labor contracts. » Read more

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