collaboration - Page number 4

Learning Fedena teaches professors how to collaborate

teacher/learner

This academic year was my first year as assistant professor in the ISIGK (المعهد العالي للإعلامية و التصرف بالقيروان‬ | Tunisia). I enjoy teaching in this institute and being in Kairouan for many personal and professional reasons. Here I will talk about the benefits of using Fedena, a School Management Software (SMS), in the ISIGK (Higher Institute of Computer Science and Management of Kairouan).

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An architecture of participation

An architecture of participation

What happens when half of the world's population lives in cities? When over three billion people are online? When there are more than 15 billion connected devices?

Old organizational models hit end-of-life. People behave differently. Organizations behave differently. What worked in the old world doesn't work in the new. » Read more

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Open source meets capitalism: Collaborate by competing

Open source meets capitalism

The internet has had a profound effect on many areas of commerce. One area the internet has not yet had a profound affect upon is how people are organized to perform work. We believe this is about to change and change dramatically. TopCoder is an early example of a ‘pure internet’ model which performs complex work at scale. » Read more

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Sharing the path to success with your employees

Sharing the path to success with your employees

I believe that the future success for businesses to attract and retain top talent relies on a more open management and leadership approach. The workforce is evolving and the new employee is part of a major change affecting not only how we hire and who we hire, but how our companies operate on a basic level. It’s especially prevalent in the new generation entering the workforce. » Read more

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An open source analogy: Open source is like sharing a recipe

Open source is like sharing a recipe

I love listening to open source gurus explain open source to those who have never encountered it, and especially to those with little computing background. In conversations with folks who may have never heard the term 'source code,' open source advocates don't typically have recourse to related words like 'Linux,' 'copyleft,' or 'binary blobs.' That comfortable vocabulary suddenly fails them, leaving them frustrated and stammering. » Read more

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GovHack, GovCamp, GovJam aim to advance Gov 2.0 in Australia

GovHack, GovCamp, GovJam aim to advance Gov 2.0 in Australia

Not one, but three upcoming events will bring more open government to Australia over the course of a week. GovHack, GovCamp, and GovJam will collectively allow citizens to interact with the public sector to collaborate, innovate, and share--advancing Gov 2.0 by using government data in new ways. » Read more

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The best idea wins: Jim Whitehurst on the Red Hat meritocracy

lightbulbs

There’s a Southern expression that goes, "Says easy, does hard." In this case, it’s easy to say that your company is focused on collaboration and ideas. But many executives conflate the terms "collaboration" and "consensus." Seeking consensus and creating a democracy of ideas is not what we at Red Hat would call collaboration. In fact, it’s a misstep. Rather, managers at Red Hat make it a practice to seek out ideas from those who’ve shown that they typically have the best ideas—those who have risen to the top of our meritocracy. » Read more

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A look inside Code for America

A look inside Code for America

Last week while I was in San Francisco for the Open Source Business Conference I stopped by to visit  Code for America. I arranged some office time a few weeks ago when I was planning my travel. This wasn’t just another office tour; this is where web geeks, city experts, and technology industry leaders are making a difference. This is where civic ideas are transformed from sticky notes and whiteboards to code. » Read more

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Flarf and the prospect of open source poetry

Flarf and the prospect of open source poetry

From the beginnings of human literature, there has been an instinct to identify with the community, the collective, more than with any individual author. Many of our most valuable texts have been created by social groups and belong to those groups. Multiple, anonymous authorship brought China its cherished Classic of Poetry, gave England Beowulf, and even accounts for parts of the Christian Bible, such as the book of Hebrews—author unknown. The Bible, by the way, tells not one definitive account of the story of Christ, but four that contain conflicting details. So despite the current celebrity mystique surrounding the individual, named author, it's safe to say that at the core of human civilization lie values of collaboration, shared experience, and shared ownership. And certain movements in literature today remind us of those values. » Read more

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MCA, the DMCA, and stifled collaboration

Paul's Boutique on the turntable

Earlier this month, the world lost a music pioneer when Adam Yauch, a.k.a “MCA” of the Beastie Boys, succumbed to cancer at the age of 47. A founding member of the Beastie Boys, Yauch expanded upon his success in the music industry to exert his considerable influence and contributions outside music. He had a strong interest in film, which resulted in him directing several of the Boys’ music videos and in 2008 led to him founding Oscilloscope Studios, which produces and promotes independent films. In the 1990s, Yauch adopted Buddhism and began getting involved socially and politically in a variety of charities and activism. » Read more

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