commons

Wikipedia Takes America photo event for your city

commons city photos

Have you visited the Wikipedia page for your hometown or the city you live in? There are likely images of local landmarks and interesting places, people, and things that are missing. To better represent your town or city, join the Wikipedia Takes America event this year! » Read more

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The selling of Open Educational Resources (OER)

open education resources

As a self-professed metadata geek, I’ve recently been participating in an online discussion about metadata and the Learning Registry. I have to say, it feels as if I’m on a merry-go-round that won’t stop, because for the past 10 years I’ve engaged in dozens if not hundreds of conversations about the use of OER (open education resources) metadata concerning these same issues: Do we need it? How should it be licensed? Who owns it?

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P2P Foundation aims to collaborate with Wikisprint

Wikisprint

The true potential of collaborative initiatives around the world is yet to be known. However, a sneak preview will take place on March 20, when hundreds of communities, networks, and institutions from widely diverse backgrounds and hailing from over 20 countries get together and take part in a global Wikisprint.

The goal of this one-day sprint, sponsored by the P2P Foundation, is to gather as many people as possible from different backgrounds and geographic areas, to map open projects and initiatives that are related to the commons and new paradigms of organization happening all over the world. 

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How far should openness extend?

How far should openness extend?

Selling the idea of open data seems straightforward. If taxpayers paid for it, a government should share it. But there have to be exceptions for National Security and privacy. » Read more

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Change By Us citizen engagement platform now open source

Change By Us citizen engagement platform now open source

As cities are facing growing demands and shrinking resources, they have to find new ways of solving problems. Change by Us, a new digital platform that enables citizens to collaborate on projects for city improvement themselves, is a promising model of a new kind of civic engagement. Launched in New York City earlier this year, the application is now being used in Philadelphia as well and is freely available for reuse through a open source license.

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Yale offers open access to millions of resources

Yale University is planning to become the first Ivy League school to offer an open access commons to millions of digital images from its archives, all free of licenses for transmission or use. » Read more

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Why we need an open wireless movement

Yesterday Peter Eckersly posted at eff.org about the EFF's coming Open Wireless Movement. Here's what he had to say:

If you sometimes find yourself needing an open wireless network in order to check your email from a car, a street corner, or a park, you may have noticed that they're getting harder to find. » Read more

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Four ways to undermine a community

At opensource.com, we often talk about ways to build and nourish communities. But sometimes what you do right is less important than what you’re doing wrong. We dug through our archives looking for cautionary tales that show how communities break down—or never begin to flourish in the first place. » Read more

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GreenXchange, a commons for the global commons, turns one

You might already know about GreenXchange. It’s a specialized sort of commons specifically for innovations (or yet to be applied innovations) for environmental sustainability.  For now, that means an on-line space to post patents and supporting materials under one of three pledges.   » Read more

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My introduction to open source

We probably all remember the first time we tried open source. Maybe you were peer-pressured, even adventurous. Or maybe you gave it a try only to find someone looking on disapprovingly, and quickly pretended you were doing something else.

My story starts back in an environmental economics course in undergrad. It has nothing to do with software, but an idea called co-production.  
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