communities

The strength of communities after the Boston Marathon tragedy

open source communities

Nothing is more powerful than people coming together for a common cause. This happens every day in open source. We write code, make commits, update Bugzilla’s, add new features, design new interfaces, add documentation, promote our projects, and strengthen the open source community with each keystroke.

But what happens in a time of crisis? What is it about our communities, both open source and local, that makes us stronger? Brings us together?

I’m a runner. It took me a while to admit it, but I love lacing up my running shoes and going out for a couple of miles. It’s my freedom from Twitter, email, and other digital connections. I think a lot when I run. About all sorts of stuff. And lately, I’ve been thinking about Boston. » Read more

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The secret ingredient in open source

Secret ingredient in open source

Open source has a secret. Do you know what it is? It has to do with a common characteristic found across successful open source communities that set them apart from others.

For those that are new to open source, understanding the intricacies of how open source communities share, communicate, and govern themselves may take a while to understand. Each community is different, but there are a few commonalities between them that lay the foundation for a successful project. If you’re just getting into open source, be sure to read more about the different tools that organize communities of practice in The Open Source Way book.

For those open source veterans out there, I think you’ll agree that » Read more

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David Eaves delivers a talk on the Science of Community at OSCON 2012

carrot + stick < love

With a background on negotiation theory, David brings a fresh and interesting perspective on the behavioral norms of open source communities. » Read more

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Community lessons from architecture and urban planning

open source lightning talks

Dave Neary manages open source standards at Red Hat, so he thinks a lot about what makes open source communities work and what makes them unique.

First, everything we are doing in open source is not brand new. People have gone before us; we should take notice of the lessons they learned and learn them ourselves. Then, two books, one about architecture and the other city planning, highlight key guidelines for design and process. » Read more

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David Eaves' OSCON keynote encourages open source communities to apply negotiation theory among contributors

OSCON podium

David Eaves (read his opensource.com posts) is an open government and open data expert with a background in negotiation theory. In his OSCON 2012 keynote today, Eaves described how the broad open source community has spent a lot of time wrestling with the art of community management and told attendees how he believes negotiation theory could be applied to improve those communities. » Read more

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How do we recycle hackathon code?

How do we reuse hackathon code?

With the sheer number of civic hackathons starting to reach a critical mass, some are asking whether the energy and drive embodied by these events can be directed to reusing existing applications or projects started at earlier events.

This is an important issue, as some projects worked on at civic hacking events aren’t actively pursued after the event is over. Is there an opportunity to better focus the energy and talents of civic hackers to reuse existing applications, or to take the work from previous hackathons further? » Read more

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Reimagining capitalism—as principled, patient, and truly social

Reimagining capitalism—as principled, patient, and truly social

While the global financial meltdown and its aftershocks have unleashed a flood of indignation, condemnation, and protest upon Wall Street, the crisis has exposed a deeper distrust and implacable resentment of capitalism itself. » Read more

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LocalWiki project spawns open source communities

LocalWiki project spawns open source communities

Who says open source is all about code and hackathons have to stick to computer hacking? Code Across America is a different kind of open source community, and it came together on February 25, 2012. This effort was part of civic innovation week (February 24-March 4), where over a dozen cities in the United States have citizens organizing to improve their cities and communities. Simultaneous events included hackathons, unconferences, meet-ups, and Code for America ’brigades’ deploying existing open source applications. This is a story about building community knowledge the open source way, using the open source platform LocalWiki. » Read more

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New report: Communities of passion

New report: Communities of passion

There are innovative organizations that most of us find inspiring because on the inside, they're essentially passionate communities. But what do companies like Google, Red Hat, IDEO, Apple, 3M, and W.L. Gore have in common? And what defines a community of passion, anyway?

Over the past few months, I've been engaged in a Management Hackathon with a few folks you might recognize from opensource.com and some other members of the Management Innovation eXchange (MIX), an online community started by Gary Hamel. » Read more

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Open source and faculty motivation

Open source and faculty motivation

When I spent some time going around North Carolina recently visiting POSSE professors, I had a realization: We encourage professors to be productively lost, to go out and feel immersed in a community, admit that they can't solve all of the problems themselves, and act more as a facilitator in the classroom. That helps them identify the right questions to ask--and the right places to ask them--online.
» Read more

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