community - Page number 17

Are you an expert in building communities? Prove it.

Over the past few months, I've started moonlighting as a contributor on the Management Innovation Exchange (MIX), which we've featured regularly here on opensource.com. My posts on the MIX focus on how to enable communities of passion in and around organizations.
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Open*Business: 2010 in review

2010 has been a fantastic year on the Business channel here at opensource.com.

The Business channel's goal is to highlight examples where the open source way has been (or could be) applied to improve businesses. Not just in software development, but in the management, culture, operations, brand, research & development, or any other part of the business.

What were some on this year's highlights? Let's start with a few stats.

Most popular articles » Read more

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The potential for Project REALISE

We got a chance to catch up with some of the folks behind Project REALISE. REALISE is an acronym that stands for Refining and learning from online tools for Internet shared enterprise. The project focuses on accessibility and ease-of-use in the field of assistive technology, and has made breakthroughs in the education, employment, and health sectors. The key, they say, is finding the right partnerships.

Lately, they've been adding to their idea lab and incubator, while growing their community and getting ready for others to participate. Dr. Mike Wald, Senior Lecturer at the University of Southampton, is part of the core project team. He is a principal investigator and conducts research into accessible technologies for the project.

Dr. Wald was happy to help us understand how Project REALISE is primed to make the world more accessible. » Read more

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Netflix completes the open source giving cycle

Netflix gets it. They understand the power of open source.

Kevin McEntee, VP of Systems & ECommerce Engineering at Netflix wrote a blog post about how Netflix does more than just consume open source. McEntee highlights three key components of the open source way that typically equate to success. He doesn't refer to them this clearly, but the three components he's really talking about are: » Read more

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Operation: Stick Figure Army turns 2D teaching into 3D learning

In Meadville, Pennsylvania, it's snowing. And when we get lake effect snow this many days in a row, the only thing to be done is to pour a cup of hot chocolate, put your feet up by the fire, and tell a yarn about open source in education.

Specifically, I'm going to tell you a story of how the research and development work of two women in computer science is going to be transformed into a service to support blind students in the classroom by 20 first-years at Allegheny College. And we need your support.

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Conflicts in open source business models

I can't imagine a world in which compromise and collaboration could be more important than in an open source business model. The model itself opens a Pandora's Box of issues that create a minefield that must be navigated on a daily basis and makes those concepts critical to success. Think, for an instance, about a world in which one or many of the possible points of differentiation are freely shared—and some even given away—without condition to parties whose interests are naturally misaligned with yours. » Read more

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How Red Hat democratized our corporate citizenship program

Community contribution has long been an important topic at Red Hat. After all, our company was built on the open source software development model and much of the code our software developers write is contributed back to the open source community. For many years, Red Hat also funded a modest US charitable giving fund--appropriate for our size, while allowing us meet our commitments to our stakeholders.

Then in 2008, a contrasting set of events changed our entire approach to charitable giving. Namely, the economic recession and the good fortune of Red Hat.
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Can rapid prototying work for your creative project?

The open source community has a phrase for the principle of rapid prototyping: “Release early, release often.” The theory is sound: Don’t wait until a project is perfect to share it. Instead, keep producing work so more people can experience it, react to it, find bugs, and improve it.

But does the principle also work in a creative environment? Ideas are fragile. Their merit is judged not just on the idea, but the quality of the execution. Often they need to be protected just to get that far. All it takes is one naysayer to sweep the legs out from under your idea.
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Making it easier to share

Starting two weeks ago, you might have noticed some shiny new objects on the site. In fact, some of you have already been distracted by them. Others of you might not have noticed at all. So we're making sure.

We finally added share buttons to each article. Specifically, we added buttons for Twitter, identi.ca, reddit, StumbleUpon, and Facebook.

The suggestion came during our first Open Your World webcast series with Stefan Lindegaard. During the pre-call, Stefan said something to the effect of, “Why don't you just put a big Twitter button on the page so I can share this content.” So we did. » Read more

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Cooperative principles can be applied in school settings

Most schools today involve rows of students seated at desks, looking toward a teacher. That teacher, who is the focus of all the students, holds the power in the classroom, but has little power to make structural changes within the school system. The educational system in the United States right now is set up to teach kids how to follow directions—and it's not doing that very well, either. Our students learn how to break the rules and not get caught. » Read more

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