community - Page number 19

A community-building perspective on the Gap logo controversy

Over the last week, a handful of folks have reached out and asked me what I think about the events surrounding the launch, then crowdsourcing, then full repeal of the new Gap logo (if you haven't already heard the story, catch up here). » Read more

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Poll: What do we do for a living?

The opensouce.com community is growing fast, and we're trying to figure out who we are and what we care about. The more we know about ourselves, the more relevant our content and discussions will be.

These polls aren't scientific, but they will give us a useful snapshot of of our growing community, so we can plan better for the future.

Feel free to tell us more about you in the comments.

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Does the market need freedom, or is it modern sharecropping?

During breakout sessions at Berlin's Free Culture Research Conference, Giorgos Cheliotis from the National University of Singapore led a discussion stemming from a recent conversation with Lawrence Lessig. The intention was a thought experiment comparing “free”--freedom and free culture—in the market with sharecropping.

Mike Linksvayer, vice-president of Creative Commons, addressed this broad conversation's main challenge on Twitter: » Read more

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Content management and the open source way with CEO of NIXTY, Part 2

In part 2 of this series on open education course tool NIXTY, Glen Moriarty, the organization's CEO, talks about the open source community and addressing NIXTY's challenges. Read part 1.

» Read more

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Open World Forum keynote panel: Challenges of open communities

During this afternoon's final keynotes at the Open World Forum, five panelists met to discuss a few of the challenges of geographical and physical barriers open communities face.

The panel was moderated by Cedric Thomas, CEO, OW2 Consortium, who was joined by: » Read more

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Fund-raising and self-publishing (the open source way): Part I

In the first half of this two-part series, author, artist, and hard-working mom Beverly Pearl discusses the challenges (and rewards) of creating of a collaborative, inexpensive, self-published art show book with open source tools. This project provides a way for the artists and community to work together, gain new skills, and deliver a professional-looking product—while hopefully raising some money for a good cause. » Read more

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Generation Facebook and higher education

I read Gary Hamel's piece, The Facebook Generation vs. the Fortune 500, with great interest. In it, he talks about the tensions that traditional, cubicle-land corporations will likely face as a creative, connected workforce comes on-line. I was particularly interested because, as a member of the higher educational establishment, I'm part of the pipeline, sitting in-between K-12 and the workplace. More importantly, I think that higher education faces many of the same challenges that the Fortune 500 does. So, with that said, I'd like to parallel Gary's piece, edging towards the extreme in my reflection (playing agent provocateur, perhaps) on the tensions between the Facebook generation and higher ed. » Read more

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Feedback is a gift

This is the fourth in a series exploring the things I have learned from the open source way during my journey with Red Hat.

Think about some of the gifts you’ve received in the past year. Some of those gifts probably were wrapped beautifully and brought you great joy and surprise. Other gifts might not have been wrapped in pretty packaging. Some gifts, you might not have appreciated and returned or, dare I say it, perhaps re-gifted. » Read more

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Barriers to open science: From big business to Watson and Crick

Science can only advance when discoveries are shared, but scientists often have a disincentive to disclose their research. So says a group of researchers from Georgia Institute of Technology in their recent article on voxEU.org, Do academic scientists share information with their colleagues? Not necessarily. In fact, scientists often make complex, calculated decisions when asked to share data:

» Read more

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Book review: What's Mine Is Yours--The Rise of Collaborative Consumption

We live in a consumer culture in the most literal sense of that word. We aren't just making purchases. We are consuming. And more than just consuming, we are obliterating our world's resources at an alarming rate. We've become accustomed--and hungry for--changing styles with the change of seasons. But what we must do now is change not clothing, nor electronics, nor cars. We must change our culture. The hardest change of all. And that's what Rachel Bostman and Roo Rogers' What's Mine Is Yours is about. » Read more

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