community - Page number 22

Handbook for practicing The Open Source Way

Imagine you are there on the day of Open Your World forum and listening to all the talks that day, seven hours so far with a few fifteen minute breaks.  You are learning, things are clearer, but all the ways of applying the open source way outside of software may have you feeling a bit lost in a sea of new ideas.

Just in time, the final talk is here, and it presents more relief than just the end of a long day.  It is here to tell you about a handbook called » Read more

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Would you share with your neighbors?

We should have all learned that sharing is a good thing at a very early age. I teach my 4-year old son to share. But what about sharing with your friends and neighbors? That's part of being a community, right?

Would you share a » Read more

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Let the open source way take you outside your comfort zone

This is the second in a series exploring the things I have learned from the open source way during my journey with Red Hat.

In the traditional proprietary software world, developers are limited in their ability to collaborate with other developers outside of their own companies. In contrast, developers in the open source software world collaborate beyond the walls of the company. And collaboration isn’t limited to software development, but also extends to collaborating in multiple ways with customers and partners. » Read more

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Build an authentic, valuable online community

Over the last two decades, I have been a member of numerous types of Internet communities and a drive-through visitor at countless more. The technology has varied: email listservs, Usenet, chat rooms, blog commenting, forums and message boards, RPG. Within theses communities the written and unwritten rules are as diverse as the underlying platforms, and these elements combine to make up the culture and communication styles of each group. » Read more

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Being more transparent about participation

Last week we published an updated version of our participation section. We wrote a short post a few weeks ago about how we could make contributing to opensource.com an easier and more transaprent process. In the spirit of release early and often, the next version is now available.

If you want to write an article for opensource.com, design an image for illustration, or take a more active role as a commenter or contributor, we've compiled some info on all of these items.

You can find them in different areas around the site or at our participate link in the header. Here is the list of what's been updated: » Read more

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Scholarships for open source contributors

Proponents of getting students involved as contributors in open source projects often cite the benefits of having a portfolio and a stellar network of references for job or even school applications. What some don't know is that there are scholarships specifically geared towards open source contributors - and that, for those who want to encourage more young people to get involved in FOSS, these scholarships are quite easy to set up and administer. » Read more

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Openness, transparency, and community: The future of commenting on the web

It's not often that I find something in the comments on a major news site that's more interesting than the original article. But that's exactly what I just came across--and it's a comment about comments. How meta. » Read more

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Fedora's Paul Frields: Leadership, trust, fail early and often

Esse quam videri. That's the first thing I saw when I went to see what Paul Frields was up to on his blog. Fun fact: it's also the North Carolina state motto and something I talk about at new hire orientation here at Red Hat. But then I thought about that phrase, and I thought about the responses to the interview questions below. I came to the conclusion that Paul is one of the few people I know who actually exemplifies the meaning of this Latin phrase. "To be, rather than to seem." » Read more

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Login to vote removed

I haven't provided a site update in a while, but wanted to share the good news that opensource.com users and community members no longer have to be logged in to vote on a poll. Yeah! You'll notice that we have polls throughout the site, mostly on the channel pages (Business, Life, etc.) and the homepage. Now, we have the ability to embed polls into blog posts and continue to display them on channel pages and the homepage. » Read more

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BusinessWeek turns an eye to open source beyond technology

Here at opensource.com, we aspire to take principles the open source software movement has applied to building better software faster and find more uses for them in business, education, government, the law, and generally in our lives. » Read more

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