creative commons - Page number 4

Should Hostess open source their recipes?

flour + butter + stuff

By now, many of you have seen that Hostess brands has closed. Many people are going to miss their favorite treats. On their website, they state the following: » Read more

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MOOCs trend towards open enrollment, not licensing

Open Education

MOOCs—or Massive Open Online Courses—have been getting a lot of attention lately. Just in the last year or so there’s been immense interest in the potential for large scale online learning, with significant investments being made in companies (Coursera, Udacity, Udemy), similar non-profit initiatives (edX), and learning management systems (Canvas, Blackboard). The renewed interest in MOOCs was ignited after last year’s Introduction to Artificial Intelligence course offered via Stanford University, when over 160,000 people signed up to take the free online course.  » Read more

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Choosing a license for your work

creative commons

Creative Commons

  • helps you share your knowledge and creativity with the world
  • develops, supports and stewards legal and technical infrastructure
  • maximizes digital creativity, sharing, and innovation

» Read more

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California passes groundbreaking open textbook legislation

Free the textbook

It’s official. In California, Governor Jerry Brown has signed two bills (SB 1052 and SB 1053) that will provide for the creation of free, openly licensed digital textbooks for the 50 most popular lower-division college courses offered by California colleges. The legislation was introduced by Senate President pro Tem Darrell Steinberg and passed by the California Senate and Assembly in late August. » Read more

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Gamer contest hosted by Mozilla, Creative Commons, and others

Liberated Pixel Cup

The Liberated Pixel Cup is a two-part gaming contest. The first part involved participants who submitted art for the games. The second part, discussed here, focuses on the games themselves. The contest is organized by Creative Commons, Free Software Foundation, OpenGameArt, and Mozilla.

» Read more

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Creative Commons applied to government, business, and journalism

Creative Commons BY

For people wanting to learn about Creative Commons and its application in different sectors, there is a sea of materials available online. In particular, Creative Commons international affiliates create a huge number of educational resources that cross language and cultural boundaries.

A few weeks ago, I wrote a post about my work sorting through some of these resources to identify some of the best, focusing on Creative Commons license use for public sector information, for publishing content on a variety of digital platforms, and for generating revenue. As promised, today I’ll highlight some of the resources I’ve discovered. » Read more

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Creating better art for open source games

Liberated Pixel Cup

For those of you that missed it, the Liberated Pixel Cup is a gaming contest where the goal is to make free software art and free software games that use said art. It was sponsored this past June and July by Creative Commons, the Free Software Foundation, Open Game Art, Mozilla, and many individuals. 

While we're still waiting on the actual results and winners of the contest, this two-part article will take a comprehensive look at the assets produced (Part I) and the games developed (Part II).

» Read more

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Creative Commons CEO reflects on YouTube's remixable library

Open video

How many of you have utilized the four million Creative Commons videos on YouTube? Cathy Casserly, CEO of Creative Commons, recently shared a guest post on YouTube's blog, reflecting on the first year of YouTube's Creative Commons video library. According to Casserly, this library is larger than any other in the world.

Casserly illustrates exactly why the Creative Commons Attribution license (also known as CC BY) is useful with several examples: » Read more

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Coming unglued: Lessons in openness from a successful crowdfunding campaign

Crowdfunding

Last month, this site featured an article about the startup I work for, Unglue.it. Briefly, we think more books should be available to the world under Creative Commons licenses, and we think authors and publishers should be paid for their work. We're doing this through a crowdfunding model: raise enough money up front to make it worthwhile, and there's no reason for authors and publishers not to make their books freely available to all. Of course, any innovative model inspires many questions, but the most common questions we get have been about open culture—from widely differing perspectives. Opensource.com has asked me to share some of what we've learned since Unglue.it completed its first successful campaign. » Read more

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Free, open ebook offers ideas for rebooting American government

How would you reboot American government?

In 2008, representatives of the Personal Democracy Forum sent dozens of writers, pundits, politicians, entrepreneurs, researchers, and think-tankers the following prompt: » Read more

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