culture - Page number 4

Facebook's developer-focused (and open?) culture

Usually when Facebook comes up at opensource.com, it's because they've done something that's very much the opposite of open. But a blog post on FrameThink this week showed Facebook's more open side. » Read more

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Copyrights vs. human rights

I wrote last week about the "Typhoid Mary" of internet restriction laws, observing how Wikileaks has confirmed that a wing of the US Government - the US Trade representative (USTR) - has been systematically bullying European and other world governments. » Read more

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Theft! A History of Music —Part 3: If I could turn forward time...

Imagine a 20-year-old musician publishing his work today. Let's pretend he's living the fast and reckless life of a rock star and will die young at 45. Because the copyright term has been ratcheted up to life of the author plus 70 years (or 95 years from publication for corporate works), you won't be able to sample his work without permission (for your heartfelt tribute song, of course), until 2105. But since you're not living his rock star lifestyle, maybe you can hang on another 95 years to grab your chance. » Read more

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Taking Collaborative Risk at The State Department

Shifting from command-and-control to collaborative culture involves what might be termed collaborative risk, but some organizations are realizing that there’s greater risk in clinging to old ways of working.

One organization that is recognizing the need for taking collaborative risk is the United States Department of State. “We’re a very risk-averse culture,” notes Duncan MacInnes, principal deputy coordinator for the Bureau of International Information Programs. State Department professionals fear that misstating policy or saying the wrong thing could become a diplomatic crisis. This parallels the fear in companies that trade secrets or market-moving information could leak. Nevertheless, the State Department has determined that the benefits of collaborating internally and externally outweigh the risks of resisting work style change. » Read more

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Open innovation and open source innovation: what do they share and where do they differ?

Recently, Stefan Lindegaard, open innovation expert and author of the new book The Open Innovation Revolution, joined opensource.com for a webcast about open innovation. » Read more

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Poll: Giving credit where credit is due

» After you vote, discuss this topic in-depth on the article, Can hierarchy and sharing co-exist, or in the comments below.

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Sitting at the intersection of brand and culture

There's a great new blog post up this week on the Harvard Business Review blog site by Bill Taylor, founder of Fast Company magazine and author of the book Mavericks at Work, entitled Brand is Culture, Culture is Brand.

As I read the post, I couldn't help but smile, as the primary point of the article is one about which I feel strongly. From the article: » Read more

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Feedback is a gift

This is the fourth in a series exploring the things I have learned from the open source way during my journey with Red Hat.

Think about some of the gifts you’ve received in the past year. Some of those gifts probably were wrapped beautifully and brought you great joy and surprise. Other gifts might not have been wrapped in pretty packaging. Some gifts, you might not have appreciated and returned or, dare I say it, perhaps re-gifted. » Read more

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The open source organization: good in theory or good in reality?

On occasion I get the opportunity to speak publicly about some of the things I've learned over the years applying the open source way in organizations. » Read more

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Inside the culture of Wikipedia: Q&A with the author of "Good Faith Collaboration"

Wikipedia is among the world's most widely recognized examples of mass collaboration. Most people also know Wikipedia is open for anyone to contribute. But what does open mean? What are the rules? Who writes them? And how do they solve inevitable disputes over content?
» Read more

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