culture - Page number 5

Can hierarchy and sharing co-exist?

I'm usually a fairly upbeat person, but there's something that never fails to depress me: the misappropriation of ideas. Don't misunderstand; I'm all about sharing. But I also believing in giving credit where it's due. And in the business world, these two ideas often seem to be at odds with one another. » Read more

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Want to reinvent management? Start with the managers.

Maybe some day we'll look back on the role of the manager in our organizations and laugh.

Such a quaint trend. Kind of like having The Clapper in every room of your house, or wearing multiple Swatch watches, or working out to Richard Simmons videos. Each seemed really helpful at the time, but looking back, we kind of wonder what the heck we were thinking. » Read more

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Designing culture: The other community plumbing

One of our frequent writers in the Business channel, Chris Grams, gave the keynote at DrupalCamp Boone today on "Designing culture: The other community plumbing." This post is based on that talk.

Drupal is great as a content management system. But as much as we like it, a community is not built by Drupal. It's built by people. Getting people to work together is not solved by a Drupal installation alone. You need culture--the other community plumbing.

Can culture be designed? Yes. » Read more

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Lawrence Lessig's new journey (part two)

I think I was as surprised as anyone when I heard that Larry Lessig was stepping away from Creative Commons. It seemed like a sudden change of direction, because Lessig has been a vocal advocate for freedom and choice for so many years. But as I hear Lessig describe his journey from Creative Commons to Change Congress, I’m reminded of Daniel Okrent’s history of the prohibition movement in the United States, "Last Call". » Read more

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Lawrence Lessig’s new journey (part one)

Maybe you’ve heard of Lawrence Lessig. Maybe as Larry Lessig. Then again, maybe you haven’t. But perhaps you’ve heard of free culture as a movement or Creative Commons or DRM, or copyright law. How about freedom? » Read more

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Is your culture made of gold or fool's gold?

When I hear people talk about how awesome their organizational culture is, I often find myself wondering what sort of “great” culture it is.

For me, great cultures fall into two categories: entitlement and mission-driven. Those “best places to work” lists don't usually make a distinction, but I do. Here is the difference:

Entitlement cultures

The surest sign of an entitlement culture? When someone tells you why they like their work, they give you an example of a benefit not related to the work itself. Some examples:
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Google and the culture of participation

Co-author: Bascha Harris

With the WWW2010 conference in Raleigh the first week of May, a slew of open source rock stars were in our hometown. Chris DiBona, Public Sector Engineering Manager at Google, was able to visit the Red Hat office and talk with us during his trip. The focus of his talk was the enormous culture of participation that companies like Google and Red Hat—and technologies like the Internet—attempt to embrace and extend, despite naysayers and proprietary business habits. » Read more

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Managing clouds and the death of formality in business

I've been toying around with a new hypothesis. Here it is:

Formality in business is dying.

Now I am not talking about Blue Jeans Friday and Bring Your Pet to Work Day all of the sudden cropping up everywhere. I've seen very formally-run businesses where people showed up in jeans with their dogs or whatever. So much superficial informality.

What I'm talking about is a fundamental shift of business culture and management practices from formal to informal in many innovative companies. What do I mean? Let's take a step back. » Read more

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Let the open source way take you outside your comfort zone

This is the second in a series exploring the things I have learned from the open source way during my journey with Red Hat.

In the traditional proprietary software world, developers are limited in their ability to collaborate with other developers outside of their own companies. In contrast, developers in the open source software world collaborate beyond the walls of the company. And collaboration isn’t limited to software development, but also extends to collaborating in multiple ways with customers and partners. » Read more

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MindTouch CEO on open standards, culture, and working at Microsoft

(...hint: it might not be what you expect!)

I recently had the pleasure of interviewing Aaron Fulkerson, founder and CEO of MindTouch. Before founding the company in 2005, Fulkerson (and co-founder Steve Bjorg) worked in Microsoft's advanced strategies division. After leaving Microsoft, the duo recognized a growing need for a scalable, easy-to-use open source collaboration platform for business and focused their efforts on a pet project, Deki Wiki. Within three years, Deki Wiki was rated as one of the Top 5 OSS projects by SourceForge.net and ultimately grew to become the company known as MindTouch today. MindTouch offers a robust enterprise collaboration platform with more than 16 million users and 400,000 web visits each month.

» Read more

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