developers - Page number 2

Creating better art for open source games

Liberated Pixel Cup

For those of you that missed it, the Liberated Pixel Cup is a gaming contest where the goal is to make free software art and free software games that use said art. It was sponsored this past June and July by Creative Commons, the Free Software Foundation, Open Game Art, Mozilla, and many individuals. 

While we're still waiting on the actual results and winners of the contest, this two-part article will take a comprehensive look at the assets produced (Part I) and the games developed (Part II).

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Should we require that open source is developed openly?

more than being open source

Roy Tennant wrote an interesting post about the definition of open source, in it he says:

"Open source" should mean exactly that and nothing more—the source code of the software is open, thereby allowing others to see it, understand it, and perhaps modify it. How the software itself is developed should be an additional aspect to the terminology, such as "openly developed open source."

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The Architecture of Open Source Applications: Learn from those before you

A new book for software developers takes a lesson from architecture. Not the structures themselves, though--the learning process for the designers. The Architecture of Open Source Applications by Amy Brown and Greg Wilson takes developers on a tour of 25 open source applications, explains how each is structured, and--most importantly--why. » Read more

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Got an idea for a healthcare mobile app? Apply for a Rock Health grant.

Applications are now being accepted for Rock Health, a program rewarding ideas that will "catalyze innovation in the interactive health space."

From Rock Health: » Read more

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Ready to be an open source contributor but don't know where to start?

In early 2009, as the stories of many websites begin, a few college friends were considering what kind of project they might start together. In this particular case, the result was OpenHatch.

OpenHatch is a place for developers who want to be involved in open source but don't know where to start. You can go to the site and search for a way to contribute based on a language you know or a project you like. You can even search for "bite-size bugs," the bugs that have been tagged by a project as being specifically good for new contributors. » Read more

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Is the word "community" losing its meaning?

Poor words. As they get more popular, as we give them more love, we also keep trying to shove in new meaning to see if they can take it.

In the technology industry, this happens over and over. Take "cloud computing," which used to mean something pretty specific and now means essentially "on the Internet" as far as I can tell. Outside the technology industry, take "news," which also used to mean something, and now is a muddy mess of news/editorial/advertising. » Read more

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