ebook

Open education author shares valuable tools for any operating system

open education resources

I first read about Chris Whittum in an article on Fosters.com. Once I read that he was interested in using open source software in education, I knew I had to learn more about him. After working in education, Chris decided to share his knowledge in an eBook called: Energize Education Through Open Source: Using Open Source Software to Enhance Learning. This resource focuses on how schools can use open source to continue to offer great lessons to students without the high price tag of similar proprietary products. » Read more

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Best of Opensource.com: Top guides for getting things done the open source way

Guides and tutorials from Opensource.com

This year at Opensource.com, we challenged our contributors to give us the best and most useful guides, how-tos, and tutorials they could produce from their experiences and work in various open source industries and sectors. In this Best of Opensource.com, our top guides and tutorials this year fell within the four buckets you see below.

If you can answer YES to any of the following questions, there's an open source way guide here for you!

Do you... » Read more

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Best of Opensource.com: Top 10 interviews in 2013

best open source interviews in 2013

Opensource.com is here to tell the stories of those who use open source—software, hardware, and ways—to work, to create, to discover, and to add knowledge back to the world. And, interviews with these open source gurus are an excellent method of delivering that kind of thought-provoking content to our readers. » Read more

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How to write your book using Linux

publishing the open source way

I spent the past year writing The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud, a book which focuses on using and thinking about cloud services in an academic research context. I’m fortunate enough to belong to a union that negotiated research leave for new faculty, and that leave made the book possible.

The content of the book might be interesting to Linux users (here is an excerpt), but I wanted to talk about the process for writing the book, which was very Linux-intensive.

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A professor learns how to change his methods to open source

open source teaching and learning

At the age of 77, I have published my first eBook and have a MOOC. These were not endeavors I ever intended to undertake.

I wanted to write Forms for a Future—a book about the civic discussions we need to have to have a future worthy of living. So, in the fall of 2007, after a 15 year absence from the world of education, I negotiated an adjunct position in the Honors College, figuring a small undergraduate class would help focus my attention. The course met three times a week and had three required full length textbooks.

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Creating an eBook using the AsciiDoc markup language

eBook open source way

For manuals and guides, Wikis are an excellent way of organizing content. Yet, they often don't work as well for larger articles or books because individual content is spread across many pages and the reader has to click around. Additionally, when you want to read online content while in a place where you cannot get an Internet connection (like, reading on the plane), another mode of content delivery is needed.

Recently, I was quite thrilled to see Opensource.com offer a thorough and skillful way of How to create an eBook the open source way. But, I am not a big fan of Wysiwig editors and prefer markup languages like LaTeX, Markdown, AsciiDoc, or even Wiki-Markup. So, here I give you an alternative: preparing content for an eBook editing AsciiDoc documents. [You can also do this on the go, in an email editor on your mobile phone or tablet.]

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How to create an eBook the open source way

Publishing the open source way

Astute readers will have noticed that we’ve begun publishing our "Open Voices" eBooks in the ePub format. Now, some of our best essays and interviews are available as lightweight and portable files, and can be read on any electronic reading device that supports this open standard.

And who better to undertake the task of converting our library than your friendly opensource.com intern? This summer, I’ve refined what I consider a simple, reliable method for creating eBooks the open source way. Today, I’d like to share it.

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Download free eBook about the principles of open government

Open government

Download our free eBook: Open VoicesApplying open source principles to government

This is the soft launch in PDF form of this eBook that collects our best articles about open government initiatives from around the world. In them, our authors discuss the intersection of open source and government, with a special focus on the way municipalities adopt and release new technologies and cultivate open source communities.
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The elusive book publishing process: A little risk, a little reward

Publishing the open source way

My favorite thing about the Internet is the way it makes so many of us into storytellers. It turns people on to sharing their own experiences, especially experiences they might be uncomfortable relating in person. My enthusiasm for the Internet’s encouragement of transparency extends beyond digital confessionals and group therapy and well into the mundane: instruction manuals; wikis packed with the sort of minutiae one used to have to wait to overhear at a cocktail party; and the open listserv a friend maintained as a shared journal, where my every entry addressed the lone lurker no one knew (but who seemed to be named Paul and kept showing up in the output of a REVIEW DIARY-L).

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Coming unglued: Lessons in openness from a successful crowdfunding campaign

Crowdfunding

Last month, this site featured an article about the startup I work for, Unglue.it. Briefly, we think more books should be available to the world under Creative Commons licenses, and we think authors and publishers should be paid for their work. We're doing this through a crowdfunding model: raise enough money up front to make it worthwhile, and there's no reason for authors and publishers not to make their books freely available to all. Of course, any innovative model inspires many questions, but the most common questions we get have been about open culture—from widely differing perspectives. Opensource.com has asked me to share some of what we've learned since Unglue.it completed its first successful campaign. » Read more

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