education - Page number 8

Scratch, a programming language for kids

learn

Scratch is a free educational programming language for kids, available in 50 different languages and runs on just about any modern computer: Linux, Macintosh, or Windows. The new guide book, Super Scratch Programming Adventure!, was authored by The LEAD Project (Learning through Engineering, Art, and Design), in Hong Kong, to make Scratch more accessible to children around the world by teaching them how to use it. 

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Graduate students in Finland solve real problems beyond the classroom

education the key

The School of Business and Information Management at Oulu University of Applied Sciences (OUAS) created an open source project management software named OpixProject. The objective was not to create something that would compete with the current project management software, but to place students in realistic problem-solving environments in order to reduce the gap between the concepts covered in the classroom and real-world experiences. » Read more

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Community spotlight: Carolyn Fox, pushing for openness at school and in the library

five questions with an opensource contributor

In our schools and our libraries, Carolyn Fox believes we can push for more openness. Just entertaining the idea of it would be a huge step in the right direction for many who aren't aware of the open source movement beyond software that is underfoot.

Through work with her son (who is gifted and has special needs) and working as a librarian, wivenhoe (as she is referred to here at opensource.com) has learned that by promoting open source tools and programs in our daily life—discussions with friends, family and coworkers—we help open up the world around us, bringing better solutions to societal problems.  » Read more

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Introducing the new culture of learning

open source lightning talks

Education is broken, but there is a new culture of learning gaining traction, according to Sebastian Dziallas, a student at the Franklin W. Olin College of Engineering.

He describes how fluid learning (departing from the 20th century "stable" structure) is first seeing what's going on (hanging out), then sticking your feet in the water (messing around), and finally getting deeply involved (geeking out). » Read more

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Open brain program aims to improve our working memories

Connections in the classroom

Brain Workshop is an open brain training program that may help children with attention deficit hyperactive disorder (ADHD) by focusing on learning and memory. It is designed to improve working memory and problem-solving abilities, or fluid intelligence, and to enhance focus and attention.

If there is an open alternative method to treating ADHD and improving learning for children with ADHD, the potential gains and impact are profound and far-reaching. If such open brain training could be used in school settings to treat children with ADHD, rather than patented medication, then potential gains and impact are even more profound. » Read more

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In Hacker Highschool, students learn to redesign the future

Knowledge is power: A hacker's curriculum

It might sound strange, but every industry and profession could benefit from an employee as creative, resourceful, and motivated as a hacker. Hackers can teach themselves how things work and how groups of things work together. Hackers know how to modify things—to adjust, personalize, and even improve them. And it is the hacker whose skillset is diverse, unique, and powerful enough to be dangerous in the hands of the wrong person. Enter ISECOMa non-profit, open source research group focused on next-generation security and professional security development and accreditationand its popular project, Hacker Highschool.

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Foradian CEO explains benefits of open source school management software

Foradian CEO on the benefits of open source school management software

Last month, a professor at the Higher Institute of Computer Science and Management of Kairouan in Tunisia told us how implementing and customizing Fedena, an open source school management solution from Foradian, enhanced collaboration and understanding between administrators, students, and instructors. » Read more

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Does the Indian education system teach students how to collaborate?

Parallels between open source and education

Education, infrastructure development, and the democratization of media are the three key sectors on which progression of any society depends. In the United States in particular, and the western world in general, the foundations of world leadership were laid when the country channeled massive investments into the educational sector. The result was a robust and innovative education system that nurtured research and advancement in society. This robust system consists of individual systems, like Harvard University and MIT, but speaks to a larger, nationwide framework on which educational policies and innovations are built. In fact, many businesses trace their origins to university labs. » Read more

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Teaching the open source way: An interview with Sameer Verma

An interview with Sameer Verma

Dr. Sameer Verma first learned about open source software when a college friend gave him a weekend crash course in Linux. Now a professor of information systems in the College of Business at San Francisco State University, Verma has taken those lessons to heart—and is teaching his own students the open source way.

Recently, we talked with Verma about the challenge of open source pedagogy, about integrating open source technologies and values into the college classroom, about the benefits of learning open source project management, and about his work with One Laptop Per Child. » Read more

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UK teachers are free to choose open source curriculum

UK teachers are free to choose open source curriculum

The UK Department of Education has confirmed that information and communications technology (ICT) lessons that teach children how to use Microsoft Word and PowerPoint will soon be more open.

Starting September 2012, computer teachers will be given “the freedom and flexibility to design an ICT curriculum that is best for their pupils,” says Michael Gove, Department of Education secretary. This means teachers can change the curriculum to teach open source if they prefer. » Read more

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