fda

Poll: Open source implantable medical devices

Karen Sandler, Executive Director of the Gnome Foundation, recently gave a talk at OSCON 2011 explaining why free software is critical on implantable medical devices. (Sandler has a defibrillator.) She's wants the FDA to collect and examine the source code used in such devices, and make the code publicly available.

Should people have the right to examine the source code of medical devices implanted in their bodies?

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Open data, apps and the FDA

One June 9th, The Department of Health and Human Services hosted the second Health Data Initiative challenge. The point behind the challenge is to promote and accelerate the use of open data to improve health. As part of the presentation, winning apps, utilizing the public data and conceived and produced by three teams of college students (one of which I use on a daily basis) were showcased. Very cool stuff.
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Increasing nutritional transparency--The FDA wants your input

If you are what you eat, do you have any idea what you are? In an increasing push for nutrition transparency, you'll soon at least know how many calories you're taking in, whether you want to or not. » Read more

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Sharing information to improve your health

The movements behind the Health 2.0 conferences and open government have together helped create or open large amounts of data of many different types. The next step is to connect all of that data so that it's actually meaningful and useful for users. There's a chance now to build things that are faster and more targeted than ever before.

Indu Subaiya, co-founder of Health 2.0, moderated a panel on the issue at SXSW, which included people from various projects using open information to improve healthcare: » Read more

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How the open source community could save your life

This article is based on a talk that Karen Sandler of the Software Freedom Law Center gave at LinuxCon 2010.

Our software must be safe. It's in cars, voting machines, financial markets. And now it's in medical devices, which our very lives depend on. » Read more

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