fedora - Page number 3

Evaluating TEDx as a brand strategy

A big part of my day job is to help organizations with their brand positioning and strategy (I also write about brand strategy quite a bit over here).

So when I read the article in the New York Times this past Sunday about TEDx, the relatively new (and incredibly popular) offshoot of the legendary TED conference, I thought it might be a good opportunity to take a closer look. The issue? » Read more

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The open source organization: good in theory or good in reality?

On occasion I get the opportunity to speak publicly about some of the things I've learned over the years applying the open source way in organizations. » Read more

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Darwin meets Dilbert: Applying the Law of Two Feet to your next meeting

I came across an interesting concept recently: the Law of Two Feet. Brilliantly simple, it says any time you're in a meeting where you're not contributing nor adding value--you are encouraged to use your two feet and find a place where you can. In other words, if it's not meaningful, and you're not doing your part to make it meaningful, move on. » Read more

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Hype vs. Reality: Today's Linux Story from the Media's Perspective (LinuxCon panel)

Five experienced technology journalists gathered to a standing-room only audience at LinuxCon Tuesday to discuss "Hype vs. Reality: Today's Linux Story from the Media's Perspective," moderated by Jennifer Cloer of the Linux Foundation.

The panel consisted of: » Read more

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A new contributor agreement for Fedora

A little over a month ago, the Fedora Project announced a plan to replace the existing Fedora Individual Contributor License Agreement (FICLA) with something new, which we've imaginatively titled the Fedora Project Contributor Agreement (FPCA). After gathering some feedback on the first draft from the Fedora community, the Fedora Project published a revised draft. » Read more

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Scholarships for open source contributors

Proponents of getting students involved as contributors in open source projects often cite the benefits of having a portfolio and a stellar network of references for job or even school applications. What some don't know is that there are scholarships specifically geared towards open source contributors - and that, for those who want to encourage more young people to get involved in FOSS, these scholarships are quite easy to set up and administer. » Read more

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Fedora's Paul Frields: Leadership, trust, fail early and often

Esse quam videri. That's the first thing I saw when I went to see what Paul Frields was up to on his blog. Fun fact: it's also the North Carolina state motto and something I talk about at new hire orientation here at Red Hat. But then I thought about that phrase, and I thought about the responses to the interview questions below. I came to the conclusion that Paul is one of the few people I know who actually exemplifies the meaning of this Latin phrase. "To be, rather than to seem." » Read more

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Allegheny first-years dive into Fedora

This semester, a colleague and I have been running a parallel set of freshman seminar courses. Darren Miller (a photography professor in the Art Department) is teaching a course titled Art and Activism, and mine is titled Technology and Activism. These topical courses are part of an Allegheny student's introduction to writing and presentation skills—and we decided to take that to another level this semester. » Read more

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Can truly great design be done the open source way?

A few weeks ago, I wrote an article about Apple and open innovation. The discussion in the comments about Apple's success, despite their non-openness, was pretty interesting. Greg DeKoenigsberg started things off with this salvo: » Read more

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Three tips for escaping the creativity peloton without giving up on collaboration

If you've ever watched a road bike race like the Tour de France, you know the peloton is the big group of riders that cluster together during the race to reduce drag. It's a great example of collaboration in action. But let's face it: the people in the middle of the peloton may go faster than they would otherwise, but they don't win the race.

When it comes to creating and innovating, most companies (and employees) are in the peloton. They are doing enough to survive, but they are stuck in the pack. And if they stay in the pack too long, they lose. » Read more

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