games

Coding adventures and contributing to open source with CodeCombat

open source game CodeCombat

When I founded my first startup in 2008, I was a programming newbie. A degree in economics from Oberlin College hadn’t prepared me for a career writing production-ready code. Despite my best efforts at slapping together crude HTML and CSS Django templates, my ability to contribute to our codebase was limited at best. So I started slowly teaching myself to code with online tutorials and lessons. After many disheartening starts and stops, I realized why I was having problems sticking with it: code lessons and videos felt like school to me, and I had no interest in returning to the classroom.

What we built next was CodeCombat, a game that teaches kids and students to code. Players use spells (JavaScript) to control their forces in a battle against Ogre enemies. And, on January 8 this year, we open sourced the entire project: servers, art, and all. You can literally clone our repo and have a working version of the game on your local machine in minutes. » Read more

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Open gaming platform Ouya matches funds for game developers

open innovation in gaming

When the hacker-friendly game console, the OUYA, was pitched as a kickstarter project in July of 2012 their tagline was "Cracking open the last closed platform." The Android-based console raised a staggering $8.6 million during its one month campaign and sparked a flurry of interest in indy game development and open hardware.

In their latest efforts to support independent content developers, OUYA has created a $1 million matching fund for game developers at http://freethegamesfund.com, which will double kickstarter pledged funds up to $250,000.

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Afraid someone will steal your idea?

release early, release often

I'm a board game designer. It's a fun, creative, scary job and worlds away from my former career in corporate advertising. In both fields, there is a high value placed on ideas, especially "new" ideas. No one wants to get scooped. Be it an ad campaign or a board game, you want to be the first out the door with it.

So it may seem odd that I've spent ten years blogging my game design process. Every one of my harebrained concepts and fully-formed prototypes go up live, viewable by everyone.

The question I get most often is: "Aren't you afraid someone will steal your idea?"

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No major coding experience required: Gaming and more with Ren'Py

open source gaming

Ren'Py, created by Tom Rothamel (@renpytom on Twitter), is an a open source tool for developing visual novels. Visual novels are the computer game equivalent of a "Choose Your Own Adventure" novel. Writing a basic game script is super simple and adding in game/programming logic (using variables, if statements, jumping to a different section of the script, etc.) is not very hard.

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Will 2013 finally be the year of Linux gaming?

year of Linux gaming

There has been some debate and consideration in recent years about when the Linux gaming platform will officially gain ground. Critics and market skeptics have wondered when it will really take off and when it will be Linux’s turn to procure large portions of the market share. New games and gaming consoles geared toward this system have left many asserting that 2013 will finally be the "year of Linux." But why?

Controversy » Read more

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Tabletop games and the thousand-year game design challenge

open source lightning talks

Daniel Solis (@danielsolis), an art director by day and game designer by night, describes what sets ancient games apart from the ones sold in today's market. Beyond big boxes, colorful pieces, and lots of noise, ancient games employ three main criteria: access, elegance, and fun. Access—across language and geographic barriers. Elegance—applying a few rules that are easily understood but take a long time to master. And fun—we all know about that. » Read more

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Five new RPG games for Linux

open source game

If you love RPG (role-playing games) and you think there's no future for these games on Linux, this post is for you. I’ll show you five new RPG games developed from scratch that run on Penguin: Questverse, Hale, Dawn, Flare and Arakion.

Just a warning: these are projects in the making, so none of them are ready to be fully played. But if you like this genre, read on, you won't be disappointed. » Read more

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Scratch, a programming language for kids

learn

Scratch is a free educational programming language for kids, available in 50 different languages and runs on just about any modern computer: Linux, Macintosh, or Windows. The new guide book, Super Scratch Programming Adventure!, was authored by The LEAD Project (Learning through Engineering, Art, and Design), in Hong Kong, to make Scratch more accessible to children around the world by teaching them how to use it. 

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Gamer contest hosted by Mozilla, Creative Commons, and others

Liberated Pixel Cup

The Liberated Pixel Cup is a two-part gaming contest. The first part involved participants who submitted art for the games. The second part, discussed here, focuses on the games themselves. The contest is organized by Creative Commons, Free Software Foundation, OpenGameArt, and Mozilla.

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The Liberated Pixel Cup: proving the potential for free culture and free software game development

Liberated Pixel Cup

What do you get when you mix the Free Software Foundation, Creative Commons, and OpenGameArt? We'll know the answer for sure come August, because these three organizations have joined forces to create the Liberated Pixel Cup. A contest where artists and developers will come together, to create free-as-in-freedom games and art.

Christopher Allan Webber from Creative Commons explains that he approached both Bart Kelsey of OpenGameArt and John Sullivan of the Free Software Foundations to see if they were interested in a collaboration.
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