gov 2.0

The danger of transparency: A lesson from Slovakia

A week ago I wrote an article about the winners of the Open Data Challenge. The winner of the application category was ZNasichDani.sk ("From Our Taxes" in Slovak), which provides an interface for users to find the people standing behind companies and enterprises that are linked to government contracts. It empowers citizens to review those connections, including contract prices and commissions. » Read more

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Can the U.S. 'win the future' without open data?

Winning the Future through Open Innovation,” is a progress report recently released by Aneesh Chopra, US Chief Technology Officer, to the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) on the Administration’s Open Government Initiative.The report highlights a number of programs at different agencies that represent a wide variety of open innovation techniques, from opening datasets and APIs to creating incentives for competition or testing and certifying open standards. » Read more

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Attacking open source because it's democratic

I get it. Anything the Democrats want, Republicans oppose. If Democrats make concessions toward Republicans, Republicans reject the concessions and make new demands.

But this is absurd. » Read more

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Zonability founder shares thoughts on apps, open data, advice to civic developers

Zonability is a zoning information web application for ‘property owners, renters, sellers, buyers, remodelers, investors, and neighborhood watchdog groups.’ It was an Apps for Californians winner and is now competing in the NYC BigApps 2.0 contest. Founder Leigh Budlong discusses her work, challenges with open data, thoughts on Gov 2.0 and shares lessons-learned advice to other civic developers. » Read more

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Tech@State: Oh, the places we STILL need to go...

The fact that the State Department hosted a conference last week on open source shows how far the U.S. Federal Government has come in terms of tech policy. Yet the content at Tech@State: Open Source often illustrated that the road ahead is still long and arduous. » Read more

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The open source revolution

Last Friday, while the first true revolution of the Web 2.0 era was reaching its climax in Tahrir Square, I was watching events unfold from within the U.S. State Department in downtown Washington D.C. I had the privilege to attend the two-day Tech@State: Open Source conference, an event organized by the Office of eDiplomacy, a relatively new wing of the State Department led by one of most cutting-edge and dynamic teams in the federal government. » Read more

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Economics of Participatory Government: The Coming (temporary) Scarcity

I’ll admit, it’s a bit of a sensational headline. But if I put the word “equilibrium” in there, you might not have reached this point.

Last year while presenting at a technology and disabilities conference, I answered a question about participatory government, gov 2.0, so on, in a way that reverberated in tones of heresy on the faces of some people.

I said something to the effect of: “There are people who don’t want to participate. We have a representative democracy and people paid to run things, and in many cases I want them to do their jobs and let me do mine.”
» Read more

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State of the Union: Is collaboration boring?

I loved this year's State of the Union address for the collaborative tone of both the President and the members of Congress.  While many were skeptical of the idea, I was especially pleased to see the effect of the mixed-party seating at the State of the Union, proposed by Sen. Mark Udall of Colorado. » Read more

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Open Source for America releases Federal Open Technology Report Card

The results are in for U.S. agencies' use of open source, thanks to a scorecard released today by Open Source for America.  The Departments of Defense and Energy had the highest scores, largely due to the fact that they have "published agency-created software code as open source and provide clear guidance identifying open source as a permitted procurement option." » Read more

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U.S. Administration's 'Technology Neutrality' Announcement Welcome News

Score another landmark for the mainstreaming of open source. 

On January 7, the Administration issued a succinct, clear message to Executive Branch IT leaders: Don't discriminate between proprietary and open source solutions when it currently spends almost $80 billion dollars to buy information » Read more

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