gov 2.0

Open source develops the future of downtown Raleigh

Can you revitalize a city and attract businesses using open source principles? David Diaz, president and CEO of the Downtown Raleigh Alliance thinks so. In fact, I got a chance to sit down with David to discuss how economic development organizations are interacting with their local and state government, citizens, businesses, and landlords. Diaz and his organization apply the principles of transparency, participation, and sharing to their economic development programs.

In part one of our interview with David Diaz, we explore how open source is applied to economic development, how his organization works with local government, and the programs Downtown Raleigh Alliance has implemented. » Read more

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Get Satisfaction: Tips for engaging citizens in gov 2.0

When we talk about open government technology, it’s often in terms of open data, open source software, social media or crowd-sourced ideation and 311 tools. What’s rarely discussed is a truly open, transparent and comprehensive platform where citizens can comment or ask government questions and get direct assistance from public servants or even their own fellow citizens. » Read more

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Did you #askobama?

I participated in the first-ever Twitter @townhall meeting hosted by the White House on July 7. Of course, I wanted to see if my questions would make it to the big screen, but I was more interested in the participation and transparency of the event. » Read more

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Creating a citizen movement for open government

How do you get techies, govies, and citizens to identify, collaborate, and start creating solutions for your local government? Host a CityCamp.

It's easier than you think. The first CityCamp Raleigh started as a conversation about citizen engagement, but we realized that we could do more than just talk about it. A dozen people came together over 12 weeks to make CityCamp Raleigh a reality. Over 225 people attended three days of collaboration, sharing, and encouraging openness--focusing on improving access to data and solutions for local government. » Read more

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Open thread: Is the US government more open and transparent?

You may have seen the news about Vivek Kundra, the United States' first Chief Information Officer (CIO), announcing he will leave the post for a fellowship at Harvard University. But will he leave behind an open source legacy?

Here's an open thread for you to chime in on: » Read more

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Open government keeps its heart in San Francisco with (second) CityCampSF

San Francisco will hold its second CityCamp, CityCampSF 2011, this Saturday, June 18, and include municipal employees, journalists, developers and neighborhood leaders “working on solutions for better communities and government.” The event is hosted by SF Department of Technology.

We asked CityCampSF founder and organizer (and Gov 2.0 Radio host) Adriel Hampton to discuss its objectives and goals and share his thoughts on the state of San Francisco open government. » Read more

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Solving city problems the open source way

I was privileged this past weekend to be involved in a twenty-first century version of participatory government.

CityCamp Raleigh was an 'unconference' with little planned structure other than the first day. We learned about unconferences, CityCamps in other cities, and problems facing citizens and state and local governments. The event brought together government, business, neighborhood, non-profit, and academic communities to re-imagine the ways in which open source collaboration and technology will shape the future of Raleigh. » Read more

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Top 5 features of new utah.gov

Data drives everything. And if you haven't taken a trip to Utah.gov lately, you're missing one of the top data-driven destinations on the web. Launched on June 1, their website redesign was based on two primary factors: (1) closely monitoring visitor behavior via website statistics and (2) pulling in diverse datasets from across the state to create what is potentially unrivaled search performance.  

I was already a big fan of the user experience in their previous iteration, built back in 2009. Believe it or not, Utah's pulled off another stunning web revitalization effort that sets a new bar not just for government web design, but for any location on the web.  

Below are my five favorite features in the new launch: » Read more

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CityCamp: Organizing an unconference for a transparent city government

Organizing an unconference is easy if you've got passionate people with the right talent, leaders with a strong vision, and the right organizational tools chosen by the team. Typically, it's a group of volunteers who come together and self-organize into a community of passion. This was also the case for the first CityCamp Raleigh, being held June 3-5.

CityCamp is an unconference focused on innovation for municipal governments and community organizations. CityCamp Raleigh is three days of open sourced talks, workshops, and hands-on problem solving, to re-imagine the way the web, applications, technology, and participation will shape the future of our city. » Read more

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Building a scalable open government process

Much of the energy and effort around open government to date has literally been hacked together or leans towards a reactive, transparency watchdog approach to making government more extroverted.

This is understandable. Any new growth area has its experimental phase and, in order to discover what works, you must try everything. After two years of open government (yes, others have been doing this much longer), we’re at a point where we’ve tried a number of tricks, and it’s time to assess what works and what doesn’t. » Read more

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