how to

With greater permissions, comes greater responsibility

open source coding

I came to work with open source after an experience in college. We used a system called Usenet,a world wide distributed discussion forum. At the university, there wasn't an email client I liked, so I wrote one and just gave it (including the source code) to whoever wanted it. This experience introduced me to a community of people who made things and shared them; it also introduced me to a job at my alma mater as a Usenet administrator. » Read more

0 Comments

How to get your conference talk submission accepted

you are a leader

Michael Davies, a part of the Linux.conf.au (LCA) conference talk review committee, spent a session at this year's conference talking about how they review talk submissions and choose which ones to accept for this large Australian open source conference. While he spoke specifically about LCA, his tips are largely applicable to those interested in submitting a talk proposal to any conference.

The LCA papers committee consists of experienced LCA attendees and volunteers who are both active in their communities and familiar with the conference. They try to keep a balance from year to year of fresh voices with experienced reviewers. The repeat reviewers help ensure that the conference maintains the same feel from year to year, so they use the previous year's papers committee with a few new members. They also consider the balance of the committee members. » Read more

1 Comment

Where to start: Upgrading your school system to open source

open education upgrade

One short article cannot hope to encapsulate the minutea for implementing open source in school districts and schools, however this primer sets the basis for the opportunities and strategies to achieve success.

When I speak about using open source I am not limiting it to replacing commercial office productivity suites with LibreOffice, as one example. This article speaks to the pervasive utilization of operating systems, productivity software, management software to all areas of the curriculum and business of a school district. It considers the relative ease for implementing open source in elementary schools as well as highly complex secondary schools under a diversity of programs and curricular requirements. » Read more

14 Comments

How to get involved with open source in 2014

Getting involved with open source in 2014

For open source projects to survive and thrive, it takes all sorts of different people contributing in various ways. We hope you are already participating in the open source community, but if you’re not, 2014 is going to be a great year to start!

Already an open source convert? Why not consider giving back in a new way this year?

Here are seven roles you might consider taking on in the new year. » Read more

5 Comments

Best of Opensource.com: Top guides for getting things done the open source way

Guides and tutorials from Opensource.com

This year at Opensource.com, we challenged our contributors to give us the best and most useful guides, how-tos, and tutorials they could produce from their experiences and work in various open source industries and sectors. In this Best of Opensource.com, our top guides and tutorials this year fell within the four buckets you see below.

If you can answer YES to any of the following questions, there's an open source way guide here for you!

Do you... » Read more

0 Comments

Your visual how-to guide for SELinux policy enforcement

SELinux policy guide

We are celebrating the SELinux 10th year anversary this year. Hard to believe it. SELinux was first introduced in Fedora Core 3 and later in Red Hat Enterprise Linux 4. For those who have never used SELinux, or would like an explanation...

» Read more

27 Comments

How to write your book using Linux

publishing the open source way

I spent the past year writing The Librarian’s Guide to Academic Research in the Cloud, a book which focuses on using and thinking about cloud services in an academic research context. I’m fortunate enough to belong to a union that negotiated research leave for new faculty, and that leave made the book possible.

The content of the book might be interesting to Linux users (here is an excerpt), but I wanted to talk about the process for writing the book, which was very Linux-intensive.

» Read more

19 Comments

The no-excuses guide to introducing yourself to a new open source project

open source projects

Getting started in an unfamiliar open source project seems intimidating because it is intimidating; plunging into the unknown usually is. Navigating new territory is a lot easier with a guide—which is why I recently taught a seminar at Hacker School on "getting started contributing to open source" that mostly amounted to "first, find a mentor." The basic steps are:

» Read more

4 Comments