IBM

Can IBM expect the same ROI from next round of investment in Linux?

return on investment

At the most recent LinxuCon, IBM announced it will invest $1B in Linux and related open source technologies over the next five years.

This is not the first time IBM has made such a significant commitment to Linux. Back in 2000, IBM invested $1B and dedicated about 1,500 engineers to work on Linux. That investment paid off handsomely: by 2003 IBM was already getting returns of about $2B per year by revitalizing its mainframe business. Deploying Linux on IBM servers had made the offering a lot more attractive for organizations interested in keeping control of their data centers. By 2003, IBM's revenue from Linux related services grew to be twice as much the revenue of patents licensing: a hint for the business models that make the most sense in a knowledge economy.

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An IBM journey from rocket engineer to the Eclipse Foundation

beautiful technology
All Things Open eBook

Download the free All Things Open interview series eBook

It's not every day you get to interview your father. And mine works for a completely different company on very different projects, but in this interview I got a chance to talk to him about a topic of common ground between us: open source—a pretty unique concept that binds an ever-growing community together.

Pat Huff has been working in the software industry since its infancy and started his career as a "rocket engineer" working on launch systems for various companies in Cape Canaveral, Florida. He got me started working with computers and programming at a young age, however, we went in a totally different directions when I left Big Blue for a small "Linux" company based out of Raleigh, North Carolina. Ironically our career paths have converged, and we are both working on open source software projects.

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Weekly wrap-up: IBM pledges $1 billion for Linux, CEO takes on patent troll, and more

open source news and highlights

Open source news this week: September 16 - 20, 2013


What other open source-related news stories did you read about this week? Share them with us in the comments section. Follow us on Twitter where we share these stories in real time.

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Could Watson be your doctor's new AI ally?

Watson by IBM

Watson, IBM’s formidable supercomputer Jeopardy contestant, made a video appearance at the annual meeting of the Healthcare Information and Management Systems Society (HIMSS). Watson appeared in a talk given by Dr. Martin Kohn, chief medical scientist for IBM's Care Delivery Systems.
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Is your organization fit for heretics?

Is your organization fit for heretics?

"Nobody ever got fired for buying IBM."

That chestnut has morphed from sales proposition to object lesson on the perils of clinging to convention in less than a generation. We've ditched the dark suits and "sincere" ties of our father's IBM for black turtlenecks and jeans, and we've embraced the "think different" ethos of Apple's celebrated campaign:

"Here's to the crazy ones. The misfits, the rebels, the troublemakers, the round pegs in square holes. The ones who see things differently."

But how much has really changed? » Read more

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Platform wars: software patents in a new light

Platform wars: software patents in a new light

I recently wrote about the $4.5 billion auction for Nortel's portfolio of 6,000 patents that went to a consortium that included Apple, Microsoft, and RIM (Blackberry) -- three of four smartphone platforms. In the wake of this sale, Interdigital has contemplated monetizing its portfolio of 8,500 patents, perhaps even putting the company up for sale. Google announced that it has bought over 1,000 patents from IBM for defensive purposes. Perennial investor Carl Icahn suggested that Motorola cash in on some of its immense portfolio of 18000 patents. » Read more

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Interview: PJ on the beginning, ending, and future of Groklaw

Over the last eight years, Pamela Jones, known as "PJ," wrote volumes at Groklaw—first as a blog about the holes in SCO's claims, then increasingly as a place for wider commentary on the legal issues facing Linux and open source. To summarize the site's mission statement, Groklaw was a full legal news resource, "acknowledged and used by all the parties, including SCO." But it was also a community—a place for open source believers to gather, learn, and share.

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Lessons learned from Groklaw: The power of collaboration

Like many, I was surprised-but-not-really when Pamela Jones announced that she would be retiring original content on the legal analysis site that grew to fame within and without the open source community as it rose to do battle with the incredibly audacious claims by The SCO Group that Linux was directly derived from UNIX. » Read more

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NASA concludes first Open Source Summit, aims to make openness the default

NASA has been implementing an Open Government Plan for nearly a year, and this week they held the first NASA Open Source Summit in Mountain View, CA. But the roots of open source at NASA go back much further, to its founding legislation in 1958, which designed NASA as a source that would "provide for the widest practicable and appropriate dissemination of information"--a goal perfectly suited to an open approach. » Read more

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Does WikiLeaks damage the brand image of wikis?

Over the past few weeks, the world has been consuming the newest set of revelations via WikiLeaks. The uproar caused by the release of the first set of diplomatic cables from a batch of 251,000 in WikiLeaks' possession is enough to take your breath away.

A disclaimer: in this post it is not my intention to analyze the positive or negative consequences of the actions of the WikiLeaks organization—there is plenty of that coverage, just check your favorite news reader every five minutes or so to see the latest. » Read more

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