interoperability

Open*Health: 2011 in review

Open source health

This year has seen a good deal of discussion about the escalating costs of healthcare and shrinking access to it. Most of the discussion has centered around how to fix the problems with a series of buzzwords entering our lexicon,  ACO, patient-centered health, EHR-EMR-HIT interoperability, and pay-for-performance among them. » Read more

0 Comments

Liquid data and the health information economy: Is 2011 finally the year?

What a difference three years makes. It seems quaint now that in the 2008 NEJM there were concerns raised about the flow of health information onto the web. Back then there was but a faint trickle of what could be entered, mostly by hand, and accessed on the web. Before HITECH and health care reform, exchanging health data online seemed blasphemous to many hospitals, patients, and physicians alike.

Fast forward to today and where we are now: » Read more

4 Comments

European Interoperability Framework supports openness

Recognizing the role of open source and open standards in innovation, the European Commission released yesterday its long-awaited “European Interoperability Framework.” This official policy (the “EIF”) » Read more

1 Comment

911: Can you hear me now?

For decades, first responders have dealt with a lack of interoperable communications products. The 9/11 Commission Report1 and the Katrina Report2 both concluded that the absence of interoperable communications among public safety organizations at the local, state, and federal levels was a serious problem and hindrance to emergency response during two of the nation’s worst disasters. » Read more

2 Comments

European Commission stands against vendor lock-in

Lock on a building

After a decade-long battle, terms of a settlement agreement were finally reached last week between the European Commission and Microsoft regarding anticompetitiveness. The official settlement is a win for European consumers, but the simultaneous Public Undertaking on Interoperability issued by the company leaves much to be desired for the open source community. » Read more

3 Comments