linux - Page number 7

Preparing for my first open source conference

Preparing for my first open source conference

It's time for a confession: I have never been to an open source conference.

I've been an open source and free culture advocate for more than half a decade. I've used open source operating systems and applications on my computers and mobile devices for nearly as long. I've contributed to open source documentation efforts. I've organized a university event to promote the principles of open source in college. And I've been writing for opensource.com.

But I've never been to an honest-to-goodness, full-blown conference. » Read more

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What's a Beefy Miracle anyway? The story of the Fedora 17 release name

Beefy Miracle

Last October, I received a message via Twitter from a hot dog. This hot dog, calling itself The Beefy Miracle, informed me that the latest version of the Fedora operating system, Fedora 17, was going to be named after it. The voting was close, but Beefy Miracle ended up winning by almost 150 votes, and it was released yesterday. » Read more

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Inspired by Linux? Design a T-shirt

Inspired by Linux? Design a T-shirt

The Linux Foundation launched their annual T-shirt design contest. The theme this year is "Inspired by Linux," and The Linux Foundation created an inspirational video urging people to create a design based on what inspires them. » Read more

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Can an iPad be used to promote free and open source software?

Can an ipad be used to promote free and open source software?

I have many Linux-using friends who have no plans whatsoever to buy an iPad, and I respect them for having that stance. They are opposed to closed, locked, proprietary systems. I share their general values, but have chosen to buy a third-generation iPad and plunge headlong into creating iBooks using iBooks Author. I see the iPad as a exquisite tool for getting the word out about FOSS - free and open source software.

Apple is expected to sell 65 million iPads (or more) in 2012, according to analyst Canaccord Genuity. That's 65 million people I can inform about FOSS opportunities, such as the amazing Inkscape vector drawing program and OpenShot video editing program. Inkscape already runs well on Mac and Windows, and OpenShot is coming to Mac and Windows, so why not seize the chance to inform people about these programs? » Read more

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See the Steam client running on Linux; likely available by the end of the year

Steam

One of the most popular posts we've ever had on opensource.com was "Steam for Linux confirmed." Unfortunately it was last year's April Fool's Day joke. But check today's date--April Fool's is almost a month ago now, and this time you can actually see pictures.

Phoronix's Michael Larabel has long stood that the Steam client would eventually be released for Linux, while many others considered it somewhere between a persistent rumor and a dream. » Read more

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Debunking The Oatmeal and the perception of Linux as difficult to use

Oatmeal and laptop

The Oatmeal made a webcomic that's been reformatted and recently passed around Facebook and other social media. It's titled “How To Fix Any Computer” and pokes fun at Windows, Apple, and Linux each in its own way. And although I love The Oatmeal, this comic’s screed on Linux promotes a myth that needs to be dispelled. The "How to fix Linux" instructions begin: » Read more

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Steam rumors are flying again, but Desura beat them to open source

Steam rumors are flying again, but Desura beat them to open source

The Desura game client is not only available for open-source-loving players, but also now for developers. They've released the client on Github as Desurium under GPL v3.

Desura is similar to the Steam gaming platform in that they both are a way for gamers to buy » Read more

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Raspberry Pi, Allwinner, and CuBox in the Linux hardware race to tiniest and cheapest

Raspberry Pi

Last month, we put the Raspberry Pi, a tiny $25 Linux computer, in our open source gift guide. It led overwhelmingly as your favorite on the list. But other similar options have been popping up, like the Allwinner A10 ($15) and the CuBox (quite a bit more). » Read more

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Kdenlive Part 6: Workflow and Conclusion

Kdenlive Part 6.  Cut and Print.

Post-production is a long and involved process. As these articles have demonstrated, Kdenlive is capable of handling every step with efficiency and flexibility. In this final article, we will discuss the final export of the full project from Kdenlive, as well as examine the over-all free software workflow of post-production. » Read more

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Kdenlive Part 5: All About Audio

Kdenlive Part 5. All About Audio.

Traditionally, the film editing process was regimented and compartmentalized. The assistant editors helped organize footage, the editor cut the picture, a sound engineer mixed the sound tracks, and a music composer provided the score. In today's quickly evolving landscape of film production, these roles are becoming less clearly defined and many of these tasks are falling upon the editor alone. And in the independent world it's been this way for a very long time. » Read more

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