medicine

Hacking on health: open source for the rare disease community

open source health

Rare diseases are defined as as those afflicting populations of fewer than 200,000 patients, or about 1 in 1,500 people. There are about 7,000 rare diseases, the majority of which are genetically related and commonly affecting the very young (infants). At first glance, rare diseases seem to only affect a small number of people, but in reality their aggregate impacts close to 30 million patients in the US, and about 25 million in the EU alone. This impact also extends to the millions of caregivers and families, who also feel and live with the disease, just in a different way.

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The open source prescription for more consumer-driven healthcare

open source prescription
All Things Open eBook

Download the free All Things Open interview series eBook

Joanne Rohde is CEO of Axial Exchange, which creates mobile tools to help patients overcome the challenges of living with chronic disease. She believes healthcare must become more consumer driven and transparent, and she doesn’t believe that’s at odds with patient privacy.

Previously, she served as COO and Director of Health IT Strategy at Red Hat and CIO of UBS Investment Banking IT.

In her talk at the All Things Open conference in October she will expand on the insights she provides in this interview, from the place where healthcare and technology meet, to include why open source is the answer for better healthcare and how it does not compromise privacy and security. » Read more

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Node.js integrates with M: a tutorial, part two

M database and node.js

In part one of this tutorial, I introduced the integration between the hierarchical data structures of the M database and the hierarchical structures of the Node.js language.

Here, in part two, I focus on the fact that this integration is equivalent to incorporating persistance storage in the Node.js language using a data model similar to JSON structures. This built upon a proven database that is known to deliver high performace for demanding applications. » Read more

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How open access to research benefits us all

Nearly a decade after the launch of the open access Malaria Journal, the publication released a report about how open access has impacted the study of malaria. Launched in 2002 as the only scientific journal devoted exclusively to malaria research, Malaria Journal became a top ranked journal for tropical medicine within just a few years.1 » Read more

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