mil-oss

Agility of open source software proves good fit for U.S. military

open source in the military

While preparing to attend the 4th Military Open Source Working Group meeting, it was refreshing and affirming to receive a notification for the event dress code:

Please remember that this is an open source software event and in honor of the glorious developers, casual attire is expected. In the event you come wearing a coat, a T-shirt will be provided to you at the door. 

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5 Questions with David A. Wheeler

5 Questions

Meet David A. Wheeler. He's a Research Staff Member for the Institute for Defense Analyses (IDA) and a well-known speaker, author, and expert on open source software and security. He helped develop the Department of Defense's open source software policy and FAQ and has written other guidance materials to help people understand how to use and collaboratively develop open source software in government. He has a Ph.D. in Information Technology, an M.S. in Computer Science, and a B.S. in Electronics Engineering. We hope you enjoy getting to know David. » Read more

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I want YOU to open source

I want YOU to open source

I recently went to the MIL-OSS ("military open source software") 2011 Working Group (WG) / Conference in Atlanta, Georgia. Topics included the open prosthetics project, releasing government-funded software as OSS, replacing MATLAB with Python, the "Open Technology Dossier Protocol" (OTDP), confining users using SELinux, an explanation of DoD policies on OSS, Charlie Schweik's study on what makes a success OSS project, and more. Some people started developing a walkie-talkie Android app at the conference. Here's a summary of the conference, if you're curious. » Read more

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Roundup: Open source in the DOD

The February issue of DACS' (Data and Analysis Center for Software) Software Tech News focuses entirely on the U.S. Department of Defense and open source software.  However, even if you aren't interested in the use of open source in the military, there are still some gems that apply to all U.S. government agencies that you might want to check out.  

The articles include: » Read more

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Mil-OSS working group 2 wrap-up

Openness in the military is coming of-age, as was evident to the attendees at the 2nd Military Open Source Software (Mil-OSS) working group held August 3-5 in Arlington, Virginia. This grassroots gathering of practitioners in the art/science of creating military capabilities was unique in its inclusive atmosphere of government civilians, military uniformed (and retired) personnel, government contractors, and university academics. All gathered with one goal: » Read more

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