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History of open source in government

pssst! open source in use here

It is difficult to imagine the Federal government moving in one well-coordinated direction on any matter, and so it has been with the adoption of open source software. Some agencies were early adopters, especially the academic and research communities. As it did in universities, open source adoption in the US government originated in research settings, where sharing and collaboration were already part of the culture of pedagogy. In this way, the government had been using and creating open source software even before it was called "open source." Other agencies and departments have been more conservative, for a variety of reasons, and are only just now bringing open source software into their operations. With this in mind, the history of open source in the US government is best understood as a series of individual stories that have collectively led to the pervasive adoption of open source we see today. » Read more

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Open source has a cyber security posse heading to POSSCON

Open source has a cyber security posse heading to POSSCON

One of my favorite projects I have the good fortune to be contributing to was created by the US Department of Homeland Security Science and Technology Directorate (that's DHS S&T in Beltway lingo, the equivalent of the R&D arm of the agency for the rest of us mere mortals)  It's called the HOST program (Homeland Open Security Technology). » Read more

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Spook developer speaks! An interview with Matthew Burton

I had a chance to talk with Matthew Burton, the former intelligence analyst turned open source cause celebre who just launched a tool that helps frame and understand arguments with imperfect evidence. It's based on method called Analysis of Competing Hypotheses (ACH), which has been around for quite some time. Matthew and his friend Josh Knowles, though, have a tool that allows the ACH method to be used by multiple participants simultaneously. It's fascinating stuff, so I'm grateful that he took the time to talk with me.

On a personal note: I'm delighted to see that Matthew is a fellow emdash enthusiast, as you'll see below.

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