open data - Page number 7

Open source food at FOOD 2.0

The Open Source Food panel raised a diverse and complicated array of ideas about what exactly open source is and how it can be applied to food from software, hardware, social, and research perspectives. The conversation began by talking about how large amounts of information about where, who, and how our food is grown, as well as what processes touch it before it even gets to us, are often not available to the average individual. » Read more

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Open Knowledge Foundation conference is OK by me

Recently I was in Berlin at OKCon organized by the Open Knowledge Foundation, and I must say it was a great event loaded with presentations and workshops; 10 hours a day, for two straight days, more than 50 sessions on 5 tracks on open data, open education, open economy and much more. Below, I’ve summarized some of the sessions I attended and found worth mentioning. » Read more

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Using open data to improve health with Todd Park, CTO of Health and Human Services (webcast recap)

Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) Entrepreneur-in-Residence, Todd Park joined us on July 7 to talk about the power of open data for improving health. His position with HHS was created by the Obama administration as a change agent. And he's taking that role seriously.
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The danger of transparency: A lesson from Slovakia

A week ago I wrote an article about the winners of the Open Data Challenge. The winner of the application category was ZNasichDani.sk ("From Our Taxes" in Slovak), which provides an interface for users to find the people standing behind companies and enterprises that are linked to government contracts. It empowers citizens to review those connections, including contract prices and commissions. » Read more

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Can the U.S. 'win the future' without open data?

Winning the Future through Open Innovation,” is a progress report recently released by Aneesh Chopra, US Chief Technology Officer, to the National Science and Technology Council (NSTC) on the Administration’s Open Government Initiative.The report highlights a number of programs at different agencies that represent a wide variety of open innovation techniques, from opening datasets and APIs to creating incentives for competition or testing and certifying open standards. » Read more

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Best of Open Data: Winners of the Open Data Challenge

Last week, the winners of the Open Data Challenge were announced at the First Digital Agenda Assembly in Brussels. The competition was divided into three main  categories: idea, application and visualization.

The winner in the idea category was bePart a mobile application that could increase citizen participation in urban projects. A citizen would be able to see current plans for urban construction projects  and review data regarding the project, such as consultation dates, cost, or duration of the implementation. The proposal urges the use of open infrastructure to build the application. » Read more

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Solving city problems the open source way

I was privileged this past weekend to be involved in a twenty-first century version of participatory government.

CityCamp Raleigh was an 'unconference' with little planned structure other than the first day. We learned about unconferences, CityCamps in other cities, and problems facing citizens and state and local governments. The event brought together government, business, neighborhood, non-profit, and academic communities to re-imagine the ways in which open source collaboration and technology will shape the future of Raleigh. » Read more

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Keeping an open mind on open government

What is innovation? In this week’s edition of Time Magazine, Fareed Zakaria writes: “We don't really have a good fix on the concept. We know it when we see it. But this much is clear: it encompasses more than just scientific or technological breakthroughs...” » Read more

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Is the future open? Ask a fourteen-year-old.

In a NY Times op-ed, David Hajdu posits that the spate of notable musicians all of the same age (turning 70 this year) is attributable to their turning 14 in the mid-1950s when rock 'n roll was just getting its start. "Fourteen is a formative age," his theory goes. What if that's not just for musicians? What about technology? And what does it mean for today's 14-year-olds? » Read more

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Attacking open source because it's democratic

I get it. Anything the Democrats want, Republicans oppose. If Democrats make concessions toward Republicans, Republicans reject the concessions and make new demands.

But this is absurd. » Read more

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