open source projects - Page number 3

10 ways to contribute to an open source project without writing code

trust in open source projects

What are the ways we can give to an open source community without contributing code?

A recent comment to an Opensource.com article a career in open source went something like that they wanted to contribute to open source but lacked coding skills. In fact, code contributions are very helpful and welcome for most open source projects, but there are a lot of other ways to contribute. » Read more

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User guide for open source project bug submissions

fixing bugs in open source projects

I recently announced a call to action for GNOME 3.10 Test Day for Fedora 20 on Facebook and I got a response that caused me to think about how everyone from the general public to developers submit and fix bugs for an open source project.

This was the interaction: » Read more

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How non-programmers can contribute to open source projects

open source projects

I get asked a lot by people who are interested in helping out open source projects, but have absolutely no programming skills. What can they do? Well, here’s a few ideas how non-programmers can contribute to open source projects.

It is worth noting that it is best to contribute to software that you actually use yourself. That way you feel the benefits.

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Create custom Linux-based systems regardless of the hardware

sharing open ideas

An interview with The Yocto Project community manager

Jeff Osier-Mixon is a community manager at Intel for The Yocto Project, an open source collaboration project that provides templates, tools and methods to help you create custom Linux-based systems for embedded products regardless of the hardware architecture. Basically: The Yocto Project allows development to happen without the worries of what hardware the code will run on.

He will be ensuring the success of The Yocto Project Developer Day on October 23. There will be two tracks, so both new and experienced users are welcome. And then, Jefro will be speaking on Friday, October 25 at Embedded Linux Conference Europe in Edinburgh, Scotland. (Note: LinuxCon Europe is from October 21- 23.)

We learned more about Jeff and his job with Intel in this interview. His Twitter profile says he's an anatidaephilic and an enchiridionophile—so, of course, we asked: Which one is worse?

» Read more

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Open hardware is the future for living with a physical disability

open source health

This year, I was privileged enough to speak at the Open Hardware Summit. It was a wonderful experience, and I hope to return again in the years to come. During my time making cool projects for Hackaday, I regularly experienced that fantastic feeling that came with the realization that people really enjoyed the things I made. I had a few that turned out to be fairly popular. This Portal Gun that levitates a companion cube, for example, has more than 1.6 million views. The Thor's Hammer with embedded Tesla coil showed up on TV screens in subways in China.

Even though I felt really good about them, there are other projects that feel even better. Those projects are simple gaming controllers for people who have physical disabilities that make it difficult for them to operate standard, off-the-shelf controllers.

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Contest and call for project contributors to Eclipse BPMN2 Modeler

open source project contest

With the growing popularity of open source, it’s getting harder and harder to attract contributors to new projects. A quick Internet search shows us that there are about 20,000+ FLOSS projects out there, and the number of new projects continues to double about every 14 months.

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Four tips for building better apps for government

open government apps

Government CIOs have ample resources to do a great job for their communities and citizens. They have smart, well-intentioned people working for them and more low-hanging fruit than most private-sector CIOs dream of.

The biggest problem is not budgetary, legal, or policy constraints, although those sure don’t help much—it's about process. It’s a matter of doing things right from day one. It's a matter of doing less, not more. Government CIOs should be thinking smaller, not bigger; setting their sights lower, not higher; and strategizing away from organization-wide change in favor of quick, tangible wins that we can all share.

4 tips for building new systems and shipping quality code in no time:

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Open source culture thrives in Chattanooga

open source city

Last week I had a chance to visit Chattanooga for several days and received an up close look at the maker and entrepreneurial culture of the city. Chattanooga is home to a municipal gigabit fiber installation, which reaches every home and business in a 600 square mile area. The city is positioning itself as a hub of digital innovation, and from where I sit they're doing quite a good job of that. Some of the smartest minds from other parts of the country are moving to Chattanooga because of the quality of life combined with structural community support for innovators.

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A viable way of building decentralized web apps

open innovation

Despite all the programming languages, the thousands of libraries, and the millions (or so it seems) of JavaScript libraries in the web ecosystem, there is still one path to building modern web applications: store everything on a server and when users open up their web browser, the "client"—the code running inside the browser—displays the data and receives user input that is sent back to the server.

This is the dumb client, smart server, powerless client, omnipotent server approach.

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Are freeloaders helpful or hurtful to open source communities?

FOSS contributors

Concerns are raised every once in a while in the broader free and open source software community about freeloaders. The attitude expressed is that if you're getting the benefit of FOSS, you should contribute. Building a business on a FOSS project you don't own, whether you're providing a service or product around a FOSS project should in return garner some sort of quid pro quo. In reality, freeloaders are desirable.

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