open source way

DevOps amplifies your open source credentials

open source experience

Can you really do DevOps without sharing scripts or code? DevOps manifesto proponents value cross-functional teams, symbiotic relationships, and continual feedback loops. Effective DevOps initiatives create engaged communities where team interactions amplify personal actions. When technology teams find adopting a DevOps culture is more difficult than using DevOps tools, suggest the open source way as a path forward.

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May open source be with you

open source story

My introduction to open source software began when I was sitting on a server room floor, with my head in my hands, completely frustrated with a Windows 2000 server. Every night there were some services that would crash. Every morning I would get yelled at by my over-bearing boss. I was new to the company, it was my first IT job fresh out of Network Admin college, where I graduated at the top of my class, but I couldn't fix this problem because it was a "known Microsoft issue," and I just had to wait for the update. » Read more

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How a festival gets planned and organized the open source way

SPARKcon open source festival

SPARKcon is an interdisciplinary creativity, art, and design festival produced by the non-profit creativity incubator, Visual Art Exchange (VAE). SPARKcon 2013 will be the 8th annual event and will be held September 12-15 in downtown Raleigh, NC. See an overview of the SPARKcon festival in this video. Read an interview with the founder of SPARKcon, Aly Khalifa, in this article.


My first encounter with SPARKcon was shortly after I moved to Raleigh when I saw someone wearing the T-shirt. Intrigued solely by the name, a quick web search told me that I had just missed the event, held each September in downtown Raleigh, and a great opportunity to get to know the local creative community.

SPARKcon is described as a "creative potluck" with an "open source, for the people, by the people" approach, showcasing "the creative hub of the South." 

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Creating an eBook using the AsciiDoc markup language

eBook open source way

For manuals and guides, Wikis are an excellent way of organizing content. Yet, they often don't work as well for larger articles or books because individual content is spread across many pages and the reader has to click around. Additionally, when you want to read online content while in a place where you cannot get an Internet connection (like, reading on the plane), another mode of content delivery is needed.

Recently, I was quite thrilled to see Opensource.com offer a thorough and skillful way of How to create an eBook the open source way. But, I am not a big fan of Wysiwig editors and prefer markup languages like LaTeX, Markdown, AsciiDoc, or even Wiki-Markup. So, here I give you an alternative: preparing content for an eBook editing AsciiDoc documents. [You can also do this on the go, in an email editor on your mobile phone or tablet.]

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Afraid someone will steal your idea?

release early, release often

I'm a board game designer. It's a fun, creative, scary job and worlds away from my former career in corporate advertising. In both fields, there is a high value placed on ideas, especially "new" ideas. No one wants to get scooped. Be it an ad campaign or a board game, you want to be the first out the door with it.

So it may seem odd that I've spent ten years blogging my game design process. Every one of my harebrained concepts and fully-formed prototypes go up live, viewable by everyone.

The question I get most often is: "Aren't you afraid someone will steal your idea?"

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Working with Red Hat's Pulp team

open source ingredients

This May I started my internship at Red Hat with the Pulp team. Since it was my first ever internship, I expected I would spend the summer working in a closet somewhere, on nothing of importance, and that what I worked on would be tossed out the second I left.

My first afternoon with the Pulp team, several members sat down with me and walked me through setting up my development environment and gave me a rough idea of what I would be doing. After only about 30 minutes into my first full day, I realized I was not going to spend the summer in a closet somewhere.

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Need a collaboration tool? Try email

collaboration tools

Collaboration is one of the key principles of the open source way and a major topic here on opensource.com. One of our goals to highlight great collaboration stories, and when we discuss collaboration, the need for the perfect collaboration tool frequently comes up. One article, Avoid the tool trap when building communities, provides some great insights (hint: people create community, not tools).

Email is still undoubedly one of the most preferred tools out there for collaboration. In fact, collaboration on the the Linux kernel started with the famous email Linus Torvalds sent to a mailing list back in 1991.

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The power of the open source way, an intern's story

the open source way

Before I came to Red Hat as a Social Media Marketing intern, I didn’t know a thing about open source. During the application process, I did some research into what Red Hat does and what this company is all about. I found all sorts of information about Linux, software, technology, and more.

However, my eyes were not opened to the open source way until New Hire Orientation where this idea was stressed by every speaker. I quickly realized that this is a pillar of how Red Hat does business.

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Sharing is at the heart of the open source way

Share

The creators of open source software benefit people they will never meet in person. The kindness is baked right into the product. I'm a former computer programmer, and whenever I use an open source program I have an appreciation for the hundreds (and sometimes thousands) of hours of work that went into creating the program.

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April Fools' Day pranks the open source way

amphicar

April Fools' Day is not a national holiday, so no, you don't get to stay at home and play with your Raspberry Pi or read Hacker News all day. But, you do get to the opportunity to join a community of pranksters around the globe who will invariably succeed in some knee-slapping, good humor. 

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