open source - Page number 17

Can citizens use open source to create legislation?

two-way street sign

In recent weeks we've seen a number of projects in the area of collaborative legislation that operate similarly to open source software. Today, you can find French, German, and Swiss proposals in git repositories. If you're a developer familiar with these tools, it's easy for you to review the patches (bills), submit your own, and collaborate around the code (law). These are exciting projects undertaken by people in many different countries, but very few governing bodies appear to be harnessing their citizens' input. » Read more

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By the numbers: India saves and grows with free and open source software

rupee

Free and open source software (FOSS) plays an indispensable role in developing countries. As it is often a substitute for more expensive proprietary software, it can impact the economy and progress of a country, like India, in a very positive way.

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Mozilla measures interest in their open source projects using site metrics

wave graph

David Boswell has a couple of interesting posts (here and here) about how he is using metrics to measure how effective Mozilla is at attracting and engaging people who express an interest in helping contribute to the Mozilla mission. » Read more

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Open source is not limited to software

computer software on old hardware

I am a technology practitioner and promoter of open source software (OSS). It ismy job to speak about the open source model in order to facilitate its adoption, to discuss its relevance and viability with regards to the strategic and economic needs of our time. » Read more

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Open source misrepresented on TV again, community speaks out

open source on TV

You wouldn't think supporters of open source would be collectively discussing Disney's latest episode of "Shake It Up," but there's a first time for everything. Earlier this week, the children's TV show misrepresented the meaning of open source, reminding us that in film and TV script writers often generalize programs, platforms and ideas in technology to the point of skewing the definition of them completely.

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The code for open source milk is cracked

alternative milks

My son was recently put on a temporary alternative milk diet, no cow, rice, or soy milk. I panicked. My entire life my family has been a cow's milk household—I don't know a life without dairy products. We had been making our own yogurt, so I hoped that would help.  Thank goodness, my son and my family don't have a nut allergy. Otherwise I would panic more.

First, I shop. Then, panic, again. Finally, I do the math. And, yes, panic. Cow's milk is usually $2.99 (USD) or more for a gallon where I live, and almond or coconut milk is around $2.99 (US) for half that amount.  » Read more

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An intern's story: Gaining perspective from keynote speakers

what i've learned the open source way

My first two months as the public relations intern at Red Hat were fast-paced and exciting, just what I had hoped for as I entered an internship in an industry where I had little prior experience. What I wasn't prepared for was an open source culture that was more embracing that I could have imagined. » Read more

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One bug, millions of dollars lost: An argument for open source solutions

annoying bugs

On August 1, Knight Capital Group, a financial services company, lost $440 million in less than an hour because of a software bug. As I understand it, this bug could have been avoided if more thorough testing was done before release but, as the Omaha World-Herald reports, the company "rushed to develop a computer program so it could take advantage of a new Wall Street venue for trading stocks...and failed to fully work out the kinks in its system."

In an op-ed piece in NYTimes.com, Ellen Ullman, a former software engineer and author, talks about how the SEC's call to companies like Knight to "fully test their computer systems before deploying coding changes" is an impossibility. Ellen writes: » Read more

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Mailing lists: Community or communication?

Core purpose

Mailing lists seem to be the life blood of many open source projects. Here at Red Hat, there seems to be a mailing list for everything. There’s a company-wide memo-list to foster collaboration and connect with colleagues around the world and many special interest mailing lists like our home beer brewing list. Which got me thinking, are mailing lists only a way to communicate or are they essential to community building? » Read more

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Top 10 signs your company doesn't "get" open source

open source lightning talks

Guy Martin, Managing Principal Architect at Red Hat, gives us the big reasons why companies shy away from using open source —and other misconceptions, like not being able to mix and match open and closed source applications and thinking open source is only about risk management. » Read more

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