open source - Page number 59

A community-building perspective on the Gap logo controversy

Over the last week, a handful of folks have reached out and asked me what I think about the events surrounding the launch, then crowdsourcing, then full repeal of the new Gap logo (if you haven't already heard the story, catch up here). » Read more

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Open standards explained

Co-author: Bascha Harris

What if you woke up one day, and every file on your computer in a particular format—say all your word processing documents, or all your photographs—no longer worked?

Not that big of a deal, right? Just a few photos or files.

But what if you're a photographer and it's your business that's now vanished? » Read more

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Fund-raising and self-publishing (the open source way), Part two

This is the second part of a two-part series examining an open source publishing project--an art book--as a fund-raising effort. If you missed it, you might want to catch the first half in our archives.

Publishing

Print-on-demand self-publishing companies abound. The trouble with most of them--if you want to stick with open source--is that they » Read more

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Does the market need freedom, or is it modern sharecropping?

During breakout sessions at Berlin's Free Culture Research Conference, Giorgos Cheliotis from the National University of Singapore led a discussion stemming from a recent conversation with Lawrence Lessig. The intention was a thought experiment comparing “free”--freedom and free culture—in the market with sharecropping.

Mike Linksvayer, vice-president of Creative Commons, addressed this broad conversation's main challenge on Twitter: » Read more

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Mobile phone mashups: Imitation becomes innovation in China

For those of us born after 1965 it's hard to believe, but Americans once viewed Japanese cars much like they do today's products with a “made in China” label: cheap, low-quality, possibly dangerous, and likely a knockoff of a better product.
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Content management and the open source way with CEO of NIXTY, Part 2

In part 2 of this series on open education course tool NIXTY, Glen Moriarty, the organization's CEO, talks about the open source community and addressing NIXTY's challenges. Read part 1.

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Wipeout! Google Wave's inevitable crash

Well, it seems that Google Wave isn't quite dead yet after all. Turns out, they're open sourcing a bit more of the project and asking for collaboration. (Ok, someone to take over.)

I can't be the only geek who immediately thought of Monty Python and the Holy Grail upon reading the announcement. » Read more

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Open World Forum keynote panel: Challenges of open communities

During this afternoon's final keynotes at the Open World Forum, five panelists met to discuss a few of the challenges of geographical and physical barriers open communities face.

The panel was moderated by Cedric Thomas, CEO, OW2 Consortium, who was joined by: » Read more

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Transparency, participation, and collaboration: The distinguishing principles of open source

I believe that, over time, Jaspersoft’s distinction will be less about it being an open source software company and more about its abilities as a great business intelligence software company. I expect declining distinction for our open source-ness will partly occur because the success of open source software and the benefit it brings the community and customers become better accepted and understood each year (and, therefore, less unique). I also believe that the most valuable aspect of the open source model will long endure, way after the sheen fades from the download, forum post, or roadmap voting. That is, the principles of open source software are its most distinguishing characteristic and will eventually reach not just all technology companies, but all other industries as well.

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Generation Facebook and higher education

I read Gary Hamel's piece, The Facebook Generation vs. the Fortune 500, with great interest. In it, he talks about the tensions that traditional, cubicle-land corporations will likely face as a creative, connected workforce comes on-line. I was particularly interested because, as a member of the higher educational establishment, I'm part of the pipeline, sitting in-between K-12 and the workplace. More importantly, I think that higher education faces many of the same challenges that the Fortune 500 does. So, with that said, I'd like to parallel Gary's piece, edging towards the extreme in my reflection (playing agent provocateur, perhaps) on the tensions between the Facebook generation and higher ed. » Read more

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