open source - Page number 8

The strength of communities after the Boston Marathon tragedy

open source communities

Nothing is more powerful than people coming together for a common cause. This happens every day in open source. We write code, make commits, update Bugzilla’s, add new features, design new interfaces, add documentation, promote our projects, and strengthen the open source community with each keystroke.

But what happens in a time of crisis? What is it about our communities, both open source and local, that makes us stronger? Brings us together?

I’m a runner. It took me a while to admit it, but I love lacing up my running shoes and going out for a couple of miles. It’s my freedom from Twitter, email, and other digital connections. I think a lot when I run. About all sorts of stuff. And lately, I’ve been thinking about Boston. » Read more

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Why enterprises should get involved in the open cloud now

enterprises in the cloud

While startups, developers, and small businesses flock to behemoth public clouds like Amazon Web Services and Google Compute Engine that give them a profoundly efficient bang for their buck, bigger enterprises largely stick to paying the high cost for private clouds. They are wary of potential availability and security issues that, rightfully, could hamper (or cripple) their business. The perceived risk-reward of saving money by turning IT operations over to a public cloud hasn't yet permeated through to big businesses. » Read more

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Do you have access to a 3D printer?

3D printing the open source way

3D printing is changing the game. The way we strategize, plan, create, and do business is different now that objects can be materialized by adding layer upon layer. » Read more

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Increasing participation of women in Free and Open Source Software

participation in foss

Few women have been historically applying for Google Summer of Code, a program in which Google provides stipends for students to work for three months on FOSS projects. Last year, after many efforts by both the Google team and the community to increase the diversity in the program, about 100 of 1200 participants or 8.3% were women, which was a highest level of participation by women yet. » Read more

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Freeing scientific data with CC0 and Dryad repository

lightning talk

Karen Cranston (@kcranstn) is an evolutionary biologist at the National Evolutionary Synthesis Center (NESCent), a nonprofit science center dedicated to cross-disciplinary research in evolution. NESCent promotes the synthesis of information, concepts, and knowledge to address significant, emerging, or novel questions in evolutionary science and its applications. They collect new data under a Creative Commons license (CC0) to free scientific data and make it more widely available. » Read more

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Are you open source enough?

Are you open source enough?

Is your project open source enough? Are you? Are you doing enough for your communities? Accusations like these are getting thrown around more and more, often in the simple form, "X isn't really open." It's a question we've even asked ourselves from time to time when we post stories on opensource.com—is this a real example of openness? But what is "open enough?" And does it really matter? » Read more

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A preview for POSSCON 2013

POSSCON

Members from the open source world will gather in Columbia, South Carolina for the Palmetto Open Source Conference (POSSCON) on March 27-28, 2013.

For anyone looking to score a last minute ticket, the event is sold out. Last year, more than 600 people from 20 states and more than 20 colleges and universities, and 75 business and government organizations, came together in the spirit of open source to share knowledge and grow the open source community. » Read more

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Key House committee looks at abusive patent litigation

patent reform

In the latest evidence of the growing recognition that our patent system needs reform, last week the House Subcommittee on Courts, Intellectual Property, and the Internet held an informative and well-attended hearing on "Abusive Patent Litigation".

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Bob Goodlatte set the tone for the hearing: » Read more

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Open source culture: Do you vote with your code or participation?

open innovation

CTO of Getable, Mikeal Rogers, talks open source and the Github generation. What's the next big thing on the innovation horizon? And who's leading the charge? Find out in this interview.

Open source is everywhere. The digital native generation is growing up with devices, platforms, and systems that are running open source software behind the scenes and designed the open source way. » Read more

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Death Star petition inspires citizen collaboration

public domain

In October, I used "We the People" as an example of how to get citizens engaged with government in an open manner. In November, those engaged citizens petitioned the government to consider building a Death Star. By January, enough signatures had been gathered to garner the administration’s consideration and, in my mind, a well authored response. The exercise may have been a geeky back and forth which you may see as a joke, but I feel any citizen engagement is good engagement. You may also think that’s the end of the story, however, someone who read my earlier post sent me a link to the Death Star Kickstarter page. » Read more

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