open standards - Page number 4

Open*Government: 2010 in Review

So much took place in the realm of open source public policy this year, that there was plenty to write about.  Some of the government channel's first posts were about the U.S. Department of Defense's clarifications on the procurement of open source software, Forge.mil's project to bring together software developers and military leaders to create and share software, and the IIPA's recommendation that the U.S. blacklist certain countries that use open source.

But opensource.com and the government channel isn't just about software being used by governments.  It's about » Read more

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An open plea to video content providers

Netflix, Hulu, Blockbuster VOD, Vudu, and a slew of other video streaming services have been popping up left and right. Yet there's a big problem with most of these services: many of them suffer from the same mentality that the recording industry had in 1999--they are resisting the demands of their customers. » Read more

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Seeking open infrastructure: Contrasting open standards, open source, and open innovation

While “open” normally has connotations of public goods, the idea of “open”–ness has been used for decades as a competitive strategy by firms in the computers and communications industries. Phrases like “open standard,” “open source” and more recently “open innovation” have been used to refer to these strategies.

What do they have in common? Which ones really are “open”? What does “open” mean, anyway? » Read more

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European Interoperability Framework supports openness

Recognizing the role of open source and open standards in innovation, the European Commission released yesterday its long-awaited “European Interoperability Framework.” This official policy (the “EIF”) » Read more

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The role of open source in emerging economies: A Malaysian success story

2010 has been a fantastic year for open source. The progress that Malaysia has made with open source has caught the attention of governments of developed and emerging economies. I would like to share some of the opportunities, challenges, and future benefits that open source can continue to offer to economies such as Malaysia. » Read more

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Open standards policy in India: A long, but successful journey

Last week, India became another major country to join the growing, global open standards movement. After three years of intense debate and discussion, India's Department of IT in India finalized its Policy on Open Standards for e-Governance, joining the ranks of emerging economies like Brazil, South Africa and others. » Read more

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From information overload to Dark Ages 2.0?

Professionally and personally, we are an increasingly digital culture. The physical distribution channels for information, data, news, stories, and conversation we learned from as young minds are waning in popularity. Books, TV, tapes, CDs, radio, newspapers, and magazines are in decline as the music, entertainment, business information, personal conversations, and current events we demand get delivered to us in an inbox, feed, app, or social network.
» Read more

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Open standards explained

Co-author: Bascha Harris

What if you woke up one day, and every file on your computer in a particular format—say all your word processing documents, or all your photographs—no longer worked?

Not that big of a deal, right? Just a few photos or files.

But what if you're a photographer and it's your business that's now vanished? » Read more

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911: Can you hear me now?

For decades, first responders have dealt with a lack of interoperable communications products. The 9/11 Commission Report1 and the Katrina Report2 both concluded that the absence of interoperable communications among public safety organizations at the local, state, and federal levels was a serious problem and hindrance to emergency response during two of the nation’s worst disasters. » Read more

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New Public Spaces 2: Practical Design Guidelines

Last post, I discussed how governments, especially state and local, should be thinking differently about the ways they engage online with the people they serve. » Read more

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